Multifocal Corneal Topographic Changes with Excimer Laser Photorefractive Keratectomy

Hamilton Moreira, Jenny J. Garbus, Armand Fasano, Martha Lee, Terrance N. Clapham, Peter J McDonnell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy can flatten the central cornea, thereby eliminating myopic refractive errors; in older patients, however, presbyopia limits satisfaction. Computer-assisted topographic analysis of corneas after refractive surgery indicates that a minority of patients achieve a multifocal lens effect, such that they maintain reasonable acuity over a range of defocus. We have purposefully attempted to create a multifocal refractive effect and have analyzed the subsequent topographies quantitatively to determine if multifocality was achieved. In corneas not operated on and plastic hemispheres, a fairly small range of corneal powers is observed; the range of powers is increased after a monofocal ablation. After multifocal ablations, a greater spread of surface powers is observed, often with a bimodal distribution, indicative of an apparent multifocal effect. These observations suggest that in some patients undergoing photorefractive keratectomy for myopia, it may be possible to reduce symptoms of presbyopia, although a decrease in image contrast or monocular diplopia may complicate this approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)994-999
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Ophthalmology
Volume110
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Laser Corneal Surgery
Photorefractive Keratectomy
Excimer Lasers
Presbyopia
Cornea
Refractive Surgical Procedures
Diplopia
Refractive Errors
Myopia
Lenses
Plastics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Multifocal Corneal Topographic Changes with Excimer Laser Photorefractive Keratectomy. / Moreira, Hamilton; Garbus, Jenny J.; Fasano, Armand; Lee, Martha; Clapham, Terrance N.; McDonnell, Peter J.

In: Archives of Ophthalmology, Vol. 110, No. 7, 1992, p. 994-999.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moreira, Hamilton ; Garbus, Jenny J. ; Fasano, Armand ; Lee, Martha ; Clapham, Terrance N. ; McDonnell, Peter J. / Multifocal Corneal Topographic Changes with Excimer Laser Photorefractive Keratectomy. In: Archives of Ophthalmology. 1992 ; Vol. 110, No. 7. pp. 994-999.
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