Multidimensional attitudes of emergency medicine residents toward older adults

Teresita M. Hogan, Shu B. Chan, Bhakti Hansoti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: The demands of our rapidly expanding older population strain many emergency departments (EDs), and older patients experience disproportionately high adverse health outcomes. Trainee attitude is key in improving care for older adults. There is negligible knowledge of baseline emergency medicine (EM) resident attitudes regarding elder patients. Awareness of baseline attitudes can serve to better structure training for improved care of older adults. The objective of the study is to identify baseline EM resident attitudes toward older adults using a validated attitude scale and multidimensional analysis. Methods: Six EM residencies participated in a voluntary anonymous survey delivered in summer and fall 2009. We used factor analysis using the principal components method and Varimax rotation, to analyze attitude interdependence, translating the 21 survey questions into 6 independent dimensions. We adapted this survey from a validated instrument by the addition of 7 EM-specific questions to measures attitudes relevant to emergency care of elders and the training of EM residents in the geriatric competencies. Scoring was performed on a 5-point Likert scale. We compared factor scores using student t and ANOVA. Results: 173 EM residents participated showing an overall positive attitude toward older adults, with a factor score of 3.79 (3.0 being a neutral score). Attitudes trended to more negative in successive post-graduate year (PGY) levels. Conclusion: EM residents demonstrate an overall positive attitude towards the care of older adults. We noted a longitudinal hardening of attitude in social values, which are more negative in successive PGY-year levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)511-517
Number of pages7
JournalWestern Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Emergency Medicine
Social Values
Emergency Medical Services
Internship and Residency
Geriatrics
Statistical Factor Analysis
Hospital Emergency Service
Analysis of Variance
Students

Keywords

  • Attitudes
  • Emergency medicine
  • Older adults
  • Residents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Multidimensional attitudes of emergency medicine residents toward older adults. / Hogan, Teresita M.; Chan, Shu B.; Hansoti, Bhakti.

In: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 15, No. 4, 2014, p. 511-517.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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