Multi-ethnic analysis shows genetic risk and environmental predictors interact to influence 25(OH)D concentration and optimal vitamin D intake

Kathryn E. Hatchell, Qiongshi Lu, Julie A. Mares, Erin D. Michos, Alexis C. Wood, Corinne D. Engelman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

25-Hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration is a complex trait with genetic and environmental predictors that may determine how much vitamin D exposure is required to reach optimal concentration. Interactions between continuous measures of a polygenic score (PGS) and vitamin D intake (PGS*intake) or available ultraviolet (UV) radiation (PGS*UV) were evaluated in individuals of African (n = 1,099) or European (n = 8,569) ancestries. Interaction terms and joint effects (main and interaction terms) were tested using one-degree of freedom (1-DF) and 2-DF models, respectively. Models controlled for age, sex, body mass index, cohort, and dietary intake/available UV. In addition, in participants achieving Institute of Medicine (IOM) vitamin D intake recommendations, 25(OH)D was evaluated by level PGS. The 2-DF PGS*intake, 1-DF PGS*UV, and 2-DF PGS*UV results were statistically significant in participants of European ancestry (p = 3.3 × 10−18, p = 2.1 × 10−2, and p = 2.4 × 10−19, respectively), but not in those of African ancestry. In European-ancestry participants reaching IOM vitamin D intake guidelines, the percent of participants achieving adequate 25(OH)D (>20 ng/ml) increased as genetic risk decreased (72% vs. 89% in highest vs. lowest risk; p =.018). Available UV radiation and vitamin D intake interact with genetics to influence 25(OH)D. Individuals with higher genetic risk may require more vitamin D exposure to maintain optimal 25(OH)D concentrations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalGenetic epidemiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Vitamin D
National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (U.S.) Health and Medicine Division
Radiation
Body Mass Index
Guidelines

Keywords

  • ancestry-specific
  • diet
  • gene–environment interaction
  • polygenic score
  • vitamin D

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Multi-ethnic analysis shows genetic risk and environmental predictors interact to influence 25(OH)D concentration and optimal vitamin D intake. / Hatchell, Kathryn E.; Lu, Qiongshi; Mares, Julie A.; Michos, Erin D.; Wood, Alexis C.; Engelman, Corinne D.

In: Genetic epidemiology, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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