Mr imaging of brain stem gliomas

Mark G. Hueftle, Jong S. Han, Benjamin Kaufman, Jane E. Benson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Magnetic resonance (MR) and CT examinations of 26 patients with the established or clinically suspected diagnosis of brain stem glioma were reviewed. Eleven tumors were seen on both MR and CT. The entire extent of the abnormality was better outlined on MR, although CT was more advantageous in demonstrating cystic components and calcium deposition. Magnetic resonance and CT depicted focal intratumoral hemorrhage equally. Magnetic resonance was found to be particularly suitable to follow up the progression or regression of the disease. Of particular interest were two patients with evidence of aqueductal obstruction but normal CT appearance of the midbrain; the causative abnormality, believed to be a glioma, was clearly shown by MR imaging. In nine patients the normal appearance was helpful to exclude the possibility of a brain stem glioma. Thus far, results have shown 100% sensitivity (true positive ratio) and specificity (true negative ratio) with MR in the evaluation of brain stem gliomas. It is concluded that MR imaging should be the examination of choice and could be the definitive screening procedure in patients with suspected brain stem glioma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)263-267
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Computer Assisted Tomography
Volume9
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1985
Externally publishedYes

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Glioma
Brain Stem
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Mesencephalon
Hemorrhage
Calcium
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Brain stem
  • Computed tomography
  • Nuclear magnetic resonance
  • Tumor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Hueftle, M. G., Han, J. S., Kaufman, B., & Benson, J. E. (1985). Mr imaging of brain stem gliomas. Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography, 9(2), 263-267.

Mr imaging of brain stem gliomas. / Hueftle, Mark G.; Han, Jong S.; Kaufman, Benjamin; Benson, Jane E.

In: Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography, Vol. 9, No. 2, 1985, p. 263-267.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hueftle, MG, Han, JS, Kaufman, B & Benson, JE 1985, 'Mr imaging of brain stem gliomas', Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 263-267.
Hueftle MG, Han JS, Kaufman B, Benson JE. Mr imaging of brain stem gliomas. Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography. 1985;9(2):263-267.
Hueftle, Mark G. ; Han, Jong S. ; Kaufman, Benjamin ; Benson, Jane E. / Mr imaging of brain stem gliomas. In: Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography. 1985 ; Vol. 9, No. 2. pp. 263-267.
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