Mouthpiece diameter affects deposition efficiency in cast models of the human oral airways

Ta Chun Lin, Patrick N. Breysse, David L. Swift, Beth L. Laube

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We examined the effect of altering mouthpiece diameter to 1.5, 2.0, and 2.7 cm on the deposition efficiency of inertial size particles (2, 4, and 8 μm) in adult human oral-pharyngeallaryngeal (OPL) airway cast models at various inspiratory flow rates (30, 60, 90, and 120 L/min). Deposition efficiency of 2-μm particles was unaffected by changes in mouthpiece diameter at all flow rates. Deposition of 4-μm particles decreased significantly with the 2.0- and 2.7-cm mouthpieces compared to the 1.5 cm mouthpiece at 60, 90, and 120 L/min (p < 0.01). Deposition of 4-μm particles was significantly reduced with the 2.7-cm mouthpiece compared to the 2.0-cm mouthpiece at 90 and 120 L/min (p < 0.05). Deposition efficiency of 8 μm particles decreased significantly with the 2.0- and 2.7-cm mouthpieces compared to the 1.5-cm mouthpiece at 60 L/min (p < 0.05), and with the 2.7-cm mouthpiece compared to the 1.5-cm mouthpiece at 120 L/min (p < 0.05). These results suggest that the effect of mouthpiece diameter varies with particle size, with 2- and 8-μm particles least affected. However, our findings may have important implications for improving the future design of mouthpieces of devices that deliver particles with 4-μm diameters and require inspiratory flow rates of ≥60 L/min (i.e., DPIs) for adequate drug delivery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)335-341
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Aerosol Medicine: Deposition, Clearance, and Effects in the Lung
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

Keywords

  • Deposition efficiency
  • Mouthpiece
  • Oral-pharyngeal-laryngeal
  • Therapeutic aerosol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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