Mouse Sensitivity is an Independent Risk Factor for Rhinitis in Children with Asthma

Ahmad R. Sedaghat, Elizabeth C. Matsui, Sachin N. Baxi, Mary E. Bollinger, Rachel Miller, Matthew Perzanowski, Wanda Phipatanakul

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Although mouse and cockroach allergy is known to be important in urban children with asthma, the independent association of mouse and cockroach sensitization with rhinitis in these children is unknown. Objective: To determine the association of mouse and cockroach sensitization with rhinitis in urban children with asthma. Methods: As part of the Mouse Allergen and Asthma Intervention Trial, 499 urban children (5-17 years) with persistent asthma underwent spirometry, skin prick testing to 14 common environmental allergens, and serology for mouse-specific IgE. In 269 subjects, cockroach-specific IgE serology was also obtained. Patient/parent-reported rhinitis in the last 2 weeks and the last 1 year was the primary outcome measure. Mouse/cockroach exposure was measured by reported frequency of sightings. Mouse allergen-settled bedroom dust samples were also measured in mouse-sensitized children. Results: Rhinitis was reported in 49.9% and 70.2% of the participants within the last 2 weeks and the last 1 year, respectively. Serum mouse IgE level of 0.35 IU/mL or more was associated with rhinitis in the past 2 weeks (adjusted odds ratio, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.02-4.54; P =04) and the past 1 year (adjusted odds ratio, 2.40; 95% CI, 1.12-5.1; P =02) after controlling for age, race, sex, the presence of any smokers at home, primary caregiver education level, number of allergen sensitivities, cockroach IgE level of 0.35 IU/mL or more, and study site (Boston or Baltimore). Measures of home mouse exposure were not associated with rhinitis, regardless of mouse sensitivity. Cockroach sensitivity was not associated with rhinitis regardless of sensitization to other allergens. Conclusions: In urban children with asthma, increased mouse IgE, but not cockroach IgE, in the sera (mouse IgE ≥ 0.35 IU/mL) may be associated independently with rhinitis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)82-88.e1
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Keywords

  • Allergy
  • Asthma
  • IgE
  • Mouse
  • Pediatric
  • Rhinitis
  • Risk factor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy

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