Mouse allergen. II. The relationship of mouse allergen exposure to mouse sensitization and asthma morbidity in inner-city children with asthma

Wanda Phipatanakul, Peyton A. Eggleston, Elizabeth C. Wright, Robert A. Wood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Although mouse allergen is known to cause occupational asthma in laboratory workers, its potential significance in home environments has never been studied. Objective: This study was designed to define the prevalence of mouse sensitivity and its relationship to mouse allergen exposure and disease activity in inner-city children with asthma. Methods: A subset of 499 subjects from the National Cooperative Inner-City Asthma Study had dust samples adequate for mouse allergen analysis, as well as valid puncture skin test (PST) results. Data were analyzed to relate mouse allergen exposure and other risk factors to mouse sensitization and asthma morbidity. Results: Eighty-nine (18%) of the 499 children had a positive mouse skin test response. Children whose homes had mouse allergen levels above the median (1.60 μg/g) in the kitchen had a significantly higher rate of mouse sensitization (23% vs 11%, P =. 007). Atopy was also significantly related to mouse sensitization, with 40% of those with more than 4 positive PST responses having mouse sensitivity compared with 4% of those with no other positive PST responses (P <. 0001). When atopy and exposure were considered together, 53% of those with more than 4 positive PST responses and allergen levels above the median had a positive PST response to mouse allergen compared with 22% of those with more than 4 positive PST responses and allergen levels below the median (P <. 0001). The relationship among mouse allergen exposure, sensitization, and any measures of asthma morbidity was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Mouse allergen may be an important indoor allergen in inner-city children with asthma, with exposure and atopy contributing to mouse sensitization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1075-1080
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume106
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

Keywords

  • Asthma morbidity
  • Indoor allergens
  • Inner-city asthma
  • Mouse allergen
  • Sensitization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Mouse allergen. II. The relationship of mouse allergen exposure to mouse sensitization and asthma morbidity in inner-city children with asthma'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this