Motor vehicle crash-related mortality is associated with prehospital and hospital-based resource availability

Stephan G. Moran, Gerald McGwin, James Abernathy, Paul MacLennan, James M. Cross, Loring W. Rue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background To date, attempts to assess the relationship between motor vehicle collision (MVC)-related mortality and medical resources availability have largely been unsuccessful.Methods Information regarding sociodemographic characteristics, prehospital resources, and hospital-based resources for each county (n = 67) in the state of Alabama was obtained. MVC-related mortality rates (deaths per 1,000 collisions) by county were calculated and compared according to prehospital and hospital-based resource availability within each county after correcting for sociodemographic factors.Results Counties with 24-hour availability of a general surgeon, orthopedic surgeon, neurosurgeon, computed tomographic scanner, and operating room were shown to have decreased MVC-related mortality (relative risk (RR), 0.88). The same was true for those counties with hospitals classified as Level I-II (RR, 0.71) and Level III-IV (RR, 0.83) trauma centers compared with counties with no trauma centers.Conclusion Appropriate, readily available hospital-based resources are associated with lower MVC-related mortality rates. This information may be useful in trauma system planning and development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)273-279
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Trauma
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Motor Vehicles
Mortality
Trauma Centers
County Hospitals
Operating Rooms
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Mortality
  • Motor vehicle collisions
  • Prehospital
  • Resource availability
  • Trauma centers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Motor vehicle crash-related mortality is associated with prehospital and hospital-based resource availability. / Moran, Stephan G.; McGwin, Gerald; Abernathy, James; MacLennan, Paul; Cross, James M.; Rue, Loring W.

In: Journal of Trauma, Vol. 54, No. 2, 01.01.2003, p. 273-279.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moran, Stephan G. ; McGwin, Gerald ; Abernathy, James ; MacLennan, Paul ; Cross, James M. ; Rue, Loring W. / Motor vehicle crash-related mortality is associated with prehospital and hospital-based resource availability. In: Journal of Trauma. 2003 ; Vol. 54, No. 2. pp. 273-279.
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