Motor extinction in distinct reference frames: A double dissociation

Jennifer Heidler-Gary, Mikolaj Pawlak, Edward H. Herskovits, Melissa Newhart, Cameron Davis, Lydia A. Trupe, Argye E. Hillis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Test the hypothesis that right hemisphere stroke can cause extinction of left hand movements or movements of either hand held in left space, when both are used simultaneously, possibly depending on lesion site. Methods: 93 non-hemiplegic patients with acute right hemisphere stroke were tested for motor extinction by pressing a counter rapidly for one minute with the right hand, left hand, or both simultaneously with their hands held at their sides, or crossed over midline. Results: We identified two distinct types of motor extinction in separate patients; 20 patients extinguished left hand movements held in left or right space (left canonical body extinction); the most significantly associated voxel cluster of ischemic tissue was in the right temporal white matter. Seven patients extinguished either hand held in left space (left space extinction), and the most significantly associated voxel cluster of ischemic tissue was in right parietal white matter. Conclusions: There was a double dissociation between left canonical body extinction and left space motor extinction. Left canonical body extinction seems to be associated with more dorsal (parietal) ischemia, and left canonical body extinction seems to be associated with more ventral (temporal) ischemia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)111-119
Number of pages9
JournalBehavioural neurology
Volume26
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

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Keywords

  • Extinction
  • bimanual motor
  • left body
  • left space

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Heidler-Gary, J., Pawlak, M., Herskovits, E. H., Newhart, M., Davis, C., Trupe, L. A., & Hillis, A. E. (2013). Motor extinction in distinct reference frames: A double dissociation. Behavioural neurology, 26(1-2), 111-119. https://doi.org/10.3233/BEN-2012-110254