Motor "dexterity": Evidence that left hemisphere lateralization of motor circuit connectivity is associated with better motor performance in children

Anita D. Barber, Priti Srinivasan, Suresh E. Joel, Brian S. Caffo, James J. Pekar, Stewart H. Mostofsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Motor control relies on well-established motor circuits, which are critical for typical child development. Although many imaging studies have examined task activation during motor performance, none have examined the relationship between functional intrinsic connectivity and motor ability. The current study investigated the relationship between resting state functional connectivity within the motor network and motor performance assessment outside of the scanner in 40 typically developing right-handed children. Better motor performance correlated with greater left-lateralized (mean left hemisphere - mean right hemisphere) motor circuit connectivity. Speed, rhythmicity, and control of movements were associated with connectivity within different individual region pairs: faster speed was associated with more left-lateralized putamen-thalamus connectivity, less overflow with more left-lateralized supplementary motor-primary motor connectivity, and less dysrhythmia with more left-lateralized supplementary motor-anterior cerebellar connectivity. These findings suggest that for right-handed children, superior motor development depends on the establishment of left-hemisphere dominance in intrinsic motor network connectivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-59
Number of pages9
JournalCerebral Cortex
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Keywords

  • development
  • motor control
  • resting state network

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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