Mosquito feeding assays to determine the infectiousness of naturally infected Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte carriers

Teun Bousema, Rhoel R. Dinglasan, Isabelle Morlais, Louis C. Gouagna, Travis van Warmerdam, Parfait H. Awono-Ambene, Sarah Bonnet, Mouctar Diallo, Mamadou Coulibaly, Timoléon Tchuinkam, Bert Mulder, Geoff Targett, Chris Drakeley, Colin Sutherland, Vincent Robert, Ogobara Doumbo, Yeya Touré, Patricia M. Graves, Will Roeffen, Robert Sauerwein & 5 others Ashley Birkett, Emily Locke, Merribeth Morin, Yimin Wu, Thomas S. Churcher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: In the era of malaria elimination and eradication, drug-based and vaccine-based approaches to reduce malaria transmission are receiving greater attention. Such interventions require assays that reliably measure the transmission of Plasmodium from humans to Anopheles mosquitoes. Methods: We compared two commonly used mosquito feeding assay procedures: direct skin feeding assays and membrane feeding assays. Three conditions under which membrane feeding assays are performed were examined: assays with i) whole blood, ii) blood pellets resuspended with autologous plasma of the gametocyte carrier, and iii) blood pellets resuspended with heterologous control serum. Results: 930 transmission experiments from Cameroon, The Gambia, Mali and Senegal were included in the analyses. Direct skin feeding assays resulted in higher mosquito infection rates compared to membrane feeding assays (odds ratio 2.39, 95% confidence interval 1.94-2.95) with evident heterogeneity between studies. Mosquito infection rates in membrane feeding assays and direct skin feeding assays were strongly correlated (p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere42821
JournalPLoS One
Volume7
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 22 2012

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gametocytes
Plasmodium falciparum
Culicidae
Assays
Membranes
assays
Skin
Malaria
Gambia
Mali
Senegal
Cameroon
Anopheles
Plasmodium
skin (animal)
Infection
Blood
Vaccines
malaria
Odds Ratio

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Bousema, T., Dinglasan, R. R., Morlais, I., Gouagna, L. C., van Warmerdam, T., Awono-Ambene, P. H., ... Churcher, T. S. (2012). Mosquito feeding assays to determine the infectiousness of naturally infected Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte carriers. PLoS One, 7(8), [e42821]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0042821

Mosquito feeding assays to determine the infectiousness of naturally infected Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte carriers. / Bousema, Teun; Dinglasan, Rhoel R.; Morlais, Isabelle; Gouagna, Louis C.; van Warmerdam, Travis; Awono-Ambene, Parfait H.; Bonnet, Sarah; Diallo, Mouctar; Coulibaly, Mamadou; Tchuinkam, Timoléon; Mulder, Bert; Targett, Geoff; Drakeley, Chris; Sutherland, Colin; Robert, Vincent; Doumbo, Ogobara; Touré, Yeya; Graves, Patricia M.; Roeffen, Will; Sauerwein, Robert; Birkett, Ashley; Locke, Emily; Morin, Merribeth; Wu, Yimin; Churcher, Thomas S.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 7, No. 8, e42821, 22.08.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bousema, T, Dinglasan, RR, Morlais, I, Gouagna, LC, van Warmerdam, T, Awono-Ambene, PH, Bonnet, S, Diallo, M, Coulibaly, M, Tchuinkam, T, Mulder, B, Targett, G, Drakeley, C, Sutherland, C, Robert, V, Doumbo, O, Touré, Y, Graves, PM, Roeffen, W, Sauerwein, R, Birkett, A, Locke, E, Morin, M, Wu, Y & Churcher, TS 2012, 'Mosquito feeding assays to determine the infectiousness of naturally infected Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte carriers', PLoS One, vol. 7, no. 8, e42821. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0042821
Bousema T, Dinglasan RR, Morlais I, Gouagna LC, van Warmerdam T, Awono-Ambene PH et al. Mosquito feeding assays to determine the infectiousness of naturally infected Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte carriers. PLoS One. 2012 Aug 22;7(8). e42821. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0042821
Bousema, Teun ; Dinglasan, Rhoel R. ; Morlais, Isabelle ; Gouagna, Louis C. ; van Warmerdam, Travis ; Awono-Ambene, Parfait H. ; Bonnet, Sarah ; Diallo, Mouctar ; Coulibaly, Mamadou ; Tchuinkam, Timoléon ; Mulder, Bert ; Targett, Geoff ; Drakeley, Chris ; Sutherland, Colin ; Robert, Vincent ; Doumbo, Ogobara ; Touré, Yeya ; Graves, Patricia M. ; Roeffen, Will ; Sauerwein, Robert ; Birkett, Ashley ; Locke, Emily ; Morin, Merribeth ; Wu, Yimin ; Churcher, Thomas S. / Mosquito feeding assays to determine the infectiousness of naturally infected Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte carriers. In: PLoS One. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 8.
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AU - van Warmerdam, Travis

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AU - Sauerwein, Robert

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