Mortality trends observed in population-based surveillance of an urban slum settlement, Kibera, Kenya, 2007-2010

Beatrice Olack, Daniel R. Feikin, Leonard O. Cosmas, Kennedy O. Odero, George O. Okoth, Joel M. Montgomery, Robert F. Breiman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: We used population based infectious disease surveillance to characterize mortality rates in residents of an urban slum in Kenya. Methods: We analyzed biweekly household visit data collected two weeks before death for 749 cases who died during January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2010. We also selected controls matched by age, gender and having a biweekly household visit within two weeks before death of the corresponding case and compared the symptoms reported. Results: The overall mortality rate was 6.3 per 1,000 person years of observation (PYO) (females: 5.7; males: 6.8). Infant mortality rate was 50.2 per 1000 PYOs, and it was 15.1 per 1,000 PYOs for children <5 years old. Poisson regression indicates a significant decrease over time in overall mortality from (6.0 in 2007 to 4.0 in 2010 per 1000 PYOs; p <0.05) in persons ≥5 years old. This decrease was predominant in females (7.8 to 5.7 per 1000 PYOs; p<0.05). Two weeks before death, significantly higher prevalence for cough (OR = 4.7 [95% CI: 3.7-5.9]), fever (OR = 8.1 [95% CI: 6.1-10.7]), and diarrhea (OR = 9.1 [95% CI: 6.4-13.2]) were reported among participants who died (cases) when compared to participants who did not die (controls). Diarrhea followed by fever were independently associated with deaths (OR = 14.4 [95% CI: 7.1-29.2]), and (OR = 11.4 [95% CI: 6.7-19.4]) respectively. Conclusions: Despite accessible health care, mortality rates are high among people living in this urban slum; infectious disease syndromes appear to be linked to a substantial proportion of deaths. Rapid urbanization poses an increasing challenge in national efforts to improve health outcomes, including reducing childhood mortality rates. Targeting impoverished people in urban slums with effective interventions such as water and sanitation interventions are needed to achieve national objectives for health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere85913
JournalPloS one
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 28 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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