Mortality of a cohort of workers in the styrene-butadiene polymer manufacturing industry (1943-1982)

Genevieve Matanoski, C. Santos-Burgoa, L. Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A cohort of 12,110 male workers employed 1 or more years in eight styrene-butadiene polymer (SBR) manufacturing plants in the United States and Canada has been followed for mortality over a 40-year period, 1943 to 1982. The all-cause mortality of these workers was low [standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 0.81] compared to that of the general population. However, some specific sites of cancers had SMRs that exceeded 1.00. These sites were then examined by major work divisions. The sites of interest included leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in whites. The SMRs for cancers of the digestive tract were higher than expected, especially esophageal cancer in whites and stomach cancer in blacks. The SMR for arteriosclerotic heart disease in black workers was significantly higher than would be expected based on general population rates. Employees were assigned to a work area based on job longest held. The SMRs for specific diseases differed by work area. Production workers showed increased SMRs for hematologic neoplasms and maintenance workers, for digestive cancers. A significant excess SMR for arteriosclerotic heart disease occurred only in black maintenance workers, although excess mortality from this disease occurred in blacks regardless of where they worked the longest. A significant excess SMR for rheumatic heart disease was associated with work in the combined, all-other work areas. For many causes of death, there were significant deficits in the SMRs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)107-117
Number of pages11
JournalEnvironmental Health Perspectives
Volume86
StatePublished - 1990

Fingerprint

Styrene
Polymers
manufacturing
polymer
mortality
cancer
Mortality
industry
cardiovascular disease
Industry
Heart Diseases
Maintenance
Rheumatic Heart Disease
Neoplasms
cause of death
Hematologic Neoplasms
Esophageal Neoplasms
Manufacturing Industry
1,3-butadiene
Personnel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Mortality of a cohort of workers in the styrene-butadiene polymer manufacturing industry (1943-1982). / Matanoski, Genevieve; Santos-Burgoa, C.; Schwartz, L.

In: Environmental Health Perspectives, Vol. 86, 1990, p. 107-117.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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