Mortality in mild cognitive impairment varies by subtype, sex, and lifestyle factors: The mayo clinic study of aging

Maria Vassilaki, Ruth H. Cha, Yonas E. Geda, Michelle M. Mielke, David S. Knopman, Ronald C. Petersen, Rosebud O. Roberts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Etiologic differences in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subtypes may impact mortality. Objective: To assess the rate of death in MCI overall, and by subtype, in the population-based Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. Methods: Participants aged 70-89 years at enrollment were clinically evaluated at baseline and 15-month intervals to assess diagnoses of MCI and dementia. Mortality in MCI cases versus cognitively normal (CN) individuals was estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results: Over a median follow-up of 5.8 years, 331 of 862 (38.4%) MCI cases and 224 of 1,292 (17.3%) cognitively normal participants died. Compared to CN individuals, mortality was elevated in persons with MCI (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.79; 95% CI: 1.41 to 2.27), and was higher for non-amnestic MCI (naMCI; HR = 2.40; 95% CI: 1.72 to 3.36) than for amnestic MCI (aMCI; HR = 1.61; 95% CI: 1.25 to 2.09) after adjusting for confounders. Mortality varied significantly by sex, education, history of heart disease, and engaging in moderate physical exercise (p for interaction

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1237-1245
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume45
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cohort studies
  • incidence studies
  • mild cognitive impairment
  • mortality
  • outcomes research
  • prognosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Clinical Psychology

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