Mortality experience in a rapidly developing economy in Taiwan: infant mortality, gender gap, and occupational risks.

C. P. Wen, S. F. Tsai, S. P. Tsai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Mortality data of Taiwan for 1981 through 1986 were analyzed using three different statistics in order to assess the role of environmental and lifestyle factors in causing mortality variations. Infant mortality rates from different geographic regions generally correlated well with overall mortality from all ages, suggesting that there are many common risk factors affecting the entire age range of the population. The mortality rates of tobacco- and alcohol-related causes of death and cancers were much higher in males than females. A number of cancer sites, including the lung, the liver, the stomach, and the nasopharynx, showed more than twofold excesses in males. In contrast, females had a tenfold excess of genital cancer and a 33% higher rate of diabetes. With rapid industrialization, occupational hazards played an increasing role in the development of cancer and other causes of death. During the study period, fishermen showed increased risk for cancers of the stomach, the esophagus, and the liver, while construction workers had an increased risk for cancer of the esophagus. Peasants and soldiers had an elevated suicide mortality. Among apprentices, fatal injuries were high. Findings from this study are useful in setting priorities for health and safety programs and directing efforts such as health education programs and other preventive strategies against disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)217-225
Number of pages9
JournalAsia-Pacific Journal of Public Health
Volume6
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Infant Mortality
Taiwan
Mortality
Esophageal Neoplasms
Cause of Death
Neoplasms
Preventive Health Services
Health Priorities
Nasopharynx
Liver
Military Personnel
Health Education
Suicide
Stomach Neoplasms
Tobacco
Life Style
Stomach
Alcohols
Safety
Lung

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Mortality experience in a rapidly developing economy in Taiwan : infant mortality, gender gap, and occupational risks. / Wen, C. P.; Tsai, S. F.; Tsai, S. P.

In: Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health, Vol. 6, No. 4, 1992, p. 217-225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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