Morbidity of systemic lupus erythematosus: Role of race and socioeconomic status

Michelle Petri, Susanne Perez-Gutthann, J. Craig Longenecker, Marc Hochberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

objective: To determine if differences in morbidity of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) as measured by (1) important renal disease, (2) number of hospitalizations, and (3) neurologic disease can be explained by race, socioeconomic status (SES), or measures of compliance. design: The interrelationship of black race, SES, and the physician's assessment of compliance as risk factors for morbidity was examined in a cohort of 198 patients with SLE (179 female, 115 black). SES was measured with Nam-Powers scores for education (years), income, and job status, and source of insurance; compliance was assessed by physician global assessment and percent of protocol visits kept. Morbidity outcomes were important renal disease (creatinine level 1.5 mg/dL or greater, renal failure, nephrotic syndrome), neurologic involvement, and number of hospitalizations. setting: The Johns Hopkins Rheumatology Faculty Practice, in which both private and clinic patients are seen. results: Black patients had significantly lower SES on all measures (p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)345-353
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Medicine
Volume91
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

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Social Class
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Compliance
Morbidity
Hospitalization
Physicians
Kidney
Insurance Coverage
Nephrotic Syndrome
Rheumatology
Nervous System Diseases
Nervous System
Renal Insufficiency
Creatinine
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

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Morbidity of systemic lupus erythematosus : Role of race and socioeconomic status. / Petri, Michelle; Perez-Gutthann, Susanne; Longenecker, J. Craig; Hochberg, Marc.

In: American Journal of Medicine, Vol. 91, No. 4, 1991, p. 345-353.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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