Monoclonal antibody radioimmunodetection of human-derived colon cancer

Richard L. Wahl, Gordon Philpott, Charles W. Parker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study was designed to determine whether monoclonal antibody directed against carcinoembryonic antigen could successfully be used in the scintigraphic localization of a human- derived colon carcinoma in a hamster model. An immunoglobulin G (IgG)-l kappa monoclonal antibody, prepared in this laboratory, against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was radiolabeled with iodine-131 (131I). Four Syrian hamsters bearing GW-39 human colon cancers received intracardiac injections of 50 μCi of131I (14 μg of antibody). Gamma camera images were obtained at 24-hour intervals. Animals were sacrificed at 11 days, and the tumors and entire animals were counted. A double-label antibody experiment was conducted with131I anti-CEA and nonspecific MOPC 21 IgG iodine-125 (125I) to assess localization specificity. The scintiphotos clearly showed the tumor at 24 hours, but there was significant background (blood-pool activity). Later images at six and 11 days showed a gradual decrease in background activity and more clear definition of the tumor. Animals sacrificed at 11 days showed 48-80% of residual whole body radioactivity to be present in the tumor. However, these tumors were large at sacrifice, weighing 8.9 to 12.4 g. Specific localization was confirmed by the double-label experiments where specific localization was twice nonspecific accretion of IgG in the tumor. This study has shown that a specific monoclonal antibody can successfully be used to scintigraphically localize a colon tumor of human origin. Although clearance of background activity is a gradual process, eventually most radioactivity left in the animal is localized in the tumor. This study illustrates that the potential radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies hold as immu- nodiagnostic agents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)58-62
Number of pages5
JournalInvestigative Radiology
Volume18
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1983
Externally publishedYes

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Radioimmunodetection
Colonic Neoplasms
Monoclonal Antibodies
Carcinoembryonic Antigen
Neoplasms
Immunoglobulin G
Iodine
Radioactivity
Colon
Gamma Cameras
Antibodies
Mesocricetus
Cricetinae
Carcinoma
Injections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Wahl, R. L., Philpott, G., & Parker, C. W. (1983). Monoclonal antibody radioimmunodetection of human-derived colon cancer. Investigative Radiology, 18(1), 58-62.

Monoclonal antibody radioimmunodetection of human-derived colon cancer. / Wahl, Richard L.; Philpott, Gordon; Parker, Charles W.

In: Investigative Radiology, Vol. 18, No. 1, 1983, p. 58-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wahl, RL, Philpott, G & Parker, CW 1983, 'Monoclonal antibody radioimmunodetection of human-derived colon cancer', Investigative Radiology, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 58-62.
Wahl, Richard L. ; Philpott, Gordon ; Parker, Charles W. / Monoclonal antibody radioimmunodetection of human-derived colon cancer. In: Investigative Radiology. 1983 ; Vol. 18, No. 1. pp. 58-62.
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