Monoamine oxidase A regulates antisocial personality in whites with no history of physical abuse

Irving M Reti, Jerry Z. Xu, Jason Yanofski, Jodi McKibben, Magdalena Uhart, Yu Jen Cheng, Peter P Zandi, Oscar J Bienvenu, Jack Samuels, Virginia Willour, Laura Kasch-Semenza, Paul Costa, Karen J Bandeen Roche, William W Eaton, Gerald Nestadt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Preclinical and human family studies clearly link monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) to aggression and antisocial personality (ASP). The 30-base pair variable number tandem repeat in the MAOA promoter regulates MAOA levels, but its effects on ASP in humans are unclear. Methods: We evaluated the association of the variable number tandem repeat of the MAOA promoter with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, ASP disorder (ASPD) traits in a community sample of 435 participants from the Hopkins Epidemiology of Personality Disorders Study. Results: We did not find an association between the activity of the MAOA allele and ASPD traits; however, among whites, when subjects with a history of childhood physical abuse were excluded, the remaining subjects with low-activity alleles had ASPD trait counts that were 41% greater than those with high-activity alleles (P <.05). Conclusion: The high-activity MAOA allele is protective against ASP among whites with no history of physical abuse, lending support to a link between MAOA expression and antisocial behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)188-194
Number of pages7
JournalComprehensive Psychiatry
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011

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Antisocial Personality Disorder
Monoamine Oxidase
Alleles
Minisatellite Repeats
Personality Disorders
Physical Abuse
Aggression
Base Pairing
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Epidemiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Monoamine oxidase A regulates antisocial personality in whites with no history of physical abuse. / Reti, Irving M; Xu, Jerry Z.; Yanofski, Jason; McKibben, Jodi; Uhart, Magdalena; Cheng, Yu Jen; Zandi, Peter P; Bienvenu, Oscar J; Samuels, Jack; Willour, Virginia; Kasch-Semenza, Laura; Costa, Paul; Bandeen Roche, Karen J; Eaton, William W; Nestadt, Gerald.

In: Comprehensive Psychiatry, Vol. 52, No. 2, 03.2011, p. 188-194.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Cheng, Yu Jen

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