Monitoring peptide processing for MHC class I molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum

Nilabh Shastri, Niranjana Nagarajan, Kristin C. Lind, Takayuki Kanaseki

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Classical MHC class I molecules open a window into the cell by presenting intracellular peptides (pMHC I) on the surface. The peptides are used for immune surveillance by circulating CD8+ T and NK cells to detect and eliminate infected or tumor cells. Not surprisingly, viruses and tumor cells have evolved immune evasion mechanisms to keep the window shades down and the cytotoxic cells oblivious to their presence. Here, we review counter mechanisms that nevertheless allow the immune system to detect and eliminate cells unable to properly process antigenic peptides in the endoplasmic reticulum.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-127
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Opinion in Immunology
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Endoplasmic Reticulum
Peptides
Immune Evasion
Oncogenic Viruses
Natural Killer Cells
Immune System
T-Lymphocytes
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Monitoring peptide processing for MHC class I molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum. / Shastri, Nilabh; Nagarajan, Niranjana; Lind, Kristin C.; Kanaseki, Takayuki.

In: Current Opinion in Immunology, Vol. 26, No. 1, 01.02.2014, p. 123-127.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Shastri, Nilabh ; Nagarajan, Niranjana ; Lind, Kristin C. ; Kanaseki, Takayuki. / Monitoring peptide processing for MHC class I molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum. In: Current Opinion in Immunology. 2014 ; Vol. 26, No. 1. pp. 123-127.
@article{a32ac1a63f88429f819b04b49886b4fd,
title = "Monitoring peptide processing for MHC class I molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum",
abstract = "Classical MHC class I molecules open a window into the cell by presenting intracellular peptides (pMHC I) on the surface. The peptides are used for immune surveillance by circulating CD8+ T and NK cells to detect and eliminate infected or tumor cells. Not surprisingly, viruses and tumor cells have evolved immune evasion mechanisms to keep the window shades down and the cytotoxic cells oblivious to their presence. Here, we review counter mechanisms that nevertheless allow the immune system to detect and eliminate cells unable to properly process antigenic peptides in the endoplasmic reticulum.",
author = "Nilabh Shastri and Niranjana Nagarajan and Lind, {Kristin C.} and Takayuki Kanaseki",
year = "2014",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.coi.2013.11.006",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "26",
pages = "123--127",
journal = "Current Opinion in Immunology",
issn = "0952-7915",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Monitoring peptide processing for MHC class I molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum

AU - Shastri, Nilabh

AU - Nagarajan, Niranjana

AU - Lind, Kristin C.

AU - Kanaseki, Takayuki

PY - 2014/2/1

Y1 - 2014/2/1

N2 - Classical MHC class I molecules open a window into the cell by presenting intracellular peptides (pMHC I) on the surface. The peptides are used for immune surveillance by circulating CD8+ T and NK cells to detect and eliminate infected or tumor cells. Not surprisingly, viruses and tumor cells have evolved immune evasion mechanisms to keep the window shades down and the cytotoxic cells oblivious to their presence. Here, we review counter mechanisms that nevertheless allow the immune system to detect and eliminate cells unable to properly process antigenic peptides in the endoplasmic reticulum.

AB - Classical MHC class I molecules open a window into the cell by presenting intracellular peptides (pMHC I) on the surface. The peptides are used for immune surveillance by circulating CD8+ T and NK cells to detect and eliminate infected or tumor cells. Not surprisingly, viruses and tumor cells have evolved immune evasion mechanisms to keep the window shades down and the cytotoxic cells oblivious to their presence. Here, we review counter mechanisms that nevertheless allow the immune system to detect and eliminate cells unable to properly process antigenic peptides in the endoplasmic reticulum.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84890047365&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84890047365&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.coi.2013.11.006

DO - 10.1016/j.coi.2013.11.006

M3 - Review article

C2 - 24556408

AN - SCOPUS:84890047365

VL - 26

SP - 123

EP - 127

JO - Current Opinion in Immunology

JF - Current Opinion in Immunology

SN - 0952-7915

IS - 1

ER -