Monitoring and reducing central line-associated bloodstream infections: A national survey of state hospital associations

David J. Murphy, Dale M. Needham, Christine Goeschel, Eddy Fan, Sara E. Cosgrove, Peter J. Pronovost

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) acquired in health care institutions are common and costly. A novel monitoring and prevention program dramatically reduced CLABSIs across one state. The extent to which other states have adopted similar efforts is unknown. State hospital associations were surveyed regarding their efforts to address these infections. All 50 responding associations endorsed the importance of improving patient safety, health care quality, or health care-associated infections. Although 42 (84%) cited CLABSIs as a priority, only 11 (22%) provided statewide CLABSI rates. CLABSI programs were active in 6 (12%) states, and an additional 7 (14%) states were planning programs. Barriers identified included a lack of coordinated priorities, limited infrastructure, and inadequate resources. Although associations support efforts to improve health care quality, including CLABSI prevention, most lack coordinated statewide monitoring and prevention programs. A national collaborative to address CLABSIs may reduce these infections while building capacity to improve other aspects of health care quality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)255-260
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Medical Quality
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

Keywords

  • Catheter-related infections
  • Health services research
  • Hospital societies
  • Intensive care unit
  • Quality of health care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

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