Molecular variants of HIV-1 and their impact on vaccine development

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The global HIV pandemic is heterogenous and dynamic, and comprised of many subepidemics in different geographic locations and populations, each with distinctive features such as risk factors for transmission, clinical presentation of disease, and viral subtypes in circulation. The genetic sequencing of HIV isolates has identified 2 major groups of HIV-1 designated group M (main) and group O (outlier). 10 different subtypes have been documented within the M group, subtypes A through J, comprising more than 95% of all HIV infections worldwide. Group O viruses have not been subtyped and are of limited distribution, found mainly in west Africa and with sporadic reports in Europe and the US. HIV-1 group M viruses have been the most intensely studied due to their global prevalence, with the best characterized subtype being subtype B, the predominant subtype in Europe and North America. The capacity of HIV subtypes to recombine allows rapid and marked genetic change. The greatest genetic variation in HIV-1 has been detected in central Africa, the area with the greatest density and duration of infection. Subtype C has the greatest frequency of any subtype globally, with epidemics in South Africa, East Africa, and India. The diverse molecular variation in the HIV genome among viral subtypes presents an obstacle to the development of an effective vaccine. The need to explore the development of both envelope-based and multi-gene-based vaccines is noted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2
Number of pages1
JournalInternational Journal of STD and AIDS
Volume9
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

HIV-1
Vaccines
HIV
Viruses
Central Africa
Geographic Locations
Eastern Africa
Western Africa
Viral Genome
Pandemics
Virus Diseases
North America
South Africa
HIV Infections
India
Infection
Population
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Immunology

Cite this

Molecular variants of HIV-1 and their impact on vaccine development. / Quinn, Thomas C.

In: International Journal of STD and AIDS, Vol. 9, No. SUPPL. 1, 1998, p. 2.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6f50f326238147e89586a7c94242588d,
title = "Molecular variants of HIV-1 and their impact on vaccine development",
abstract = "The global HIV pandemic is heterogenous and dynamic, and comprised of many subepidemics in different geographic locations and populations, each with distinctive features such as risk factors for transmission, clinical presentation of disease, and viral subtypes in circulation. The genetic sequencing of HIV isolates has identified 2 major groups of HIV-1 designated group M (main) and group O (outlier). 10 different subtypes have been documented within the M group, subtypes A through J, comprising more than 95{\%} of all HIV infections worldwide. Group O viruses have not been subtyped and are of limited distribution, found mainly in west Africa and with sporadic reports in Europe and the US. HIV-1 group M viruses have been the most intensely studied due to their global prevalence, with the best characterized subtype being subtype B, the predominant subtype in Europe and North America. The capacity of HIV subtypes to recombine allows rapid and marked genetic change. The greatest genetic variation in HIV-1 has been detected in central Africa, the area with the greatest density and duration of infection. Subtype C has the greatest frequency of any subtype globally, with epidemics in South Africa, East Africa, and India. The diverse molecular variation in the HIV genome among viral subtypes presents an obstacle to the development of an effective vaccine. The need to explore the development of both envelope-based and multi-gene-based vaccines is noted.",
author = "Quinn, {Thomas C}",
year = "1998",
doi = "10.1258/0956462981921567",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
pages = "2",
journal = "International Journal of STD and AIDS",
issn = "0956-4624",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "SUPPL. 1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Molecular variants of HIV-1 and their impact on vaccine development

AU - Quinn, Thomas C

PY - 1998

Y1 - 1998

N2 - The global HIV pandemic is heterogenous and dynamic, and comprised of many subepidemics in different geographic locations and populations, each with distinctive features such as risk factors for transmission, clinical presentation of disease, and viral subtypes in circulation. The genetic sequencing of HIV isolates has identified 2 major groups of HIV-1 designated group M (main) and group O (outlier). 10 different subtypes have been documented within the M group, subtypes A through J, comprising more than 95% of all HIV infections worldwide. Group O viruses have not been subtyped and are of limited distribution, found mainly in west Africa and with sporadic reports in Europe and the US. HIV-1 group M viruses have been the most intensely studied due to their global prevalence, with the best characterized subtype being subtype B, the predominant subtype in Europe and North America. The capacity of HIV subtypes to recombine allows rapid and marked genetic change. The greatest genetic variation in HIV-1 has been detected in central Africa, the area with the greatest density and duration of infection. Subtype C has the greatest frequency of any subtype globally, with epidemics in South Africa, East Africa, and India. The diverse molecular variation in the HIV genome among viral subtypes presents an obstacle to the development of an effective vaccine. The need to explore the development of both envelope-based and multi-gene-based vaccines is noted.

AB - The global HIV pandemic is heterogenous and dynamic, and comprised of many subepidemics in different geographic locations and populations, each with distinctive features such as risk factors for transmission, clinical presentation of disease, and viral subtypes in circulation. The genetic sequencing of HIV isolates has identified 2 major groups of HIV-1 designated group M (main) and group O (outlier). 10 different subtypes have been documented within the M group, subtypes A through J, comprising more than 95% of all HIV infections worldwide. Group O viruses have not been subtyped and are of limited distribution, found mainly in west Africa and with sporadic reports in Europe and the US. HIV-1 group M viruses have been the most intensely studied due to their global prevalence, with the best characterized subtype being subtype B, the predominant subtype in Europe and North America. The capacity of HIV subtypes to recombine allows rapid and marked genetic change. The greatest genetic variation in HIV-1 has been detected in central Africa, the area with the greatest density and duration of infection. Subtype C has the greatest frequency of any subtype globally, with epidemics in South Africa, East Africa, and India. The diverse molecular variation in the HIV genome among viral subtypes presents an obstacle to the development of an effective vaccine. The need to explore the development of both envelope-based and multi-gene-based vaccines is noted.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031774132&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031774132&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1258/0956462981921567

DO - 10.1258/0956462981921567

M3 - Article

C2 - 9874106

AN - SCOPUS:0031774132

VL - 9

SP - 2

JO - International Journal of STD and AIDS

JF - International Journal of STD and AIDS

SN - 0956-4624

IS - SUPPL. 1

ER -