Molecular pathology of ovarian cancer

Kruti P. Maniar, Ie Ming Shih, Robert J Kurman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Ovarian cancer is associated with a high morbidity and mortality, and is the leading cause of gynecologic cancer-related death in the US. In recent years, the molecular pathophysiology of ovarian tumors has been better elucidated, allowing for the distinction of two tumor types: the more indolent type I tumors (encompassing endometrioid, clear cell, low-grade serous, and mucinous carcinomas) and the highly aggressive type II tumors (encompassing high-grade serous carcinomas and malignant mixed müllerian tumors). Type I tumors are related to abnormalities in the MAPK signaling pathway (KRAS and BRAF mutations), the PI3K/Akt2/PTEN pathway, and the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway, as well as mutations in other genes such as ARID1a, PPP2R1A, and HNF1-beta. Type II tumors, in contrast, are characterized by mutations in p53, as well as inactivation of BRCA1/2 and mutations in genes such as Notch3, Rsf-1, and NAC1. In this chapter, we discuss the characteristics and frequency of these molecular abnormalities, with an emphasis on their implications for diagnosis and treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMolecular Surgical Pathology
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages129-149
Number of pages21
Volume9781461449003
ISBN (Print)9781461449003, 1461448999, 9781461448990
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2013

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Molecular Pathology
Ovarian Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Mutation
Malignant Mixed Tumor
Mucinous Adenocarcinoma
Wnt Signaling Pathway
beta Catenin
Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases
Genes
Morbidity
Carcinoma
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Maniar, K. P., Shih, I. M., & Kurman, R. J. (2013). Molecular pathology of ovarian cancer. In Molecular Surgical Pathology (Vol. 9781461449003, pp. 129-149). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-4900-3_7

Molecular pathology of ovarian cancer. / Maniar, Kruti P.; Shih, Ie Ming; Kurman, Robert J.

Molecular Surgical Pathology. Vol. 9781461449003 Springer New York, 2013. p. 129-149.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Maniar, KP, Shih, IM & Kurman, RJ 2013, Molecular pathology of ovarian cancer. in Molecular Surgical Pathology. vol. 9781461449003, Springer New York, pp. 129-149. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-4900-3_7
Maniar KP, Shih IM, Kurman RJ. Molecular pathology of ovarian cancer. In Molecular Surgical Pathology. Vol. 9781461449003. Springer New York. 2013. p. 129-149 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-4900-3_7
Maniar, Kruti P. ; Shih, Ie Ming ; Kurman, Robert J. / Molecular pathology of ovarian cancer. Molecular Surgical Pathology. Vol. 9781461449003 Springer New York, 2013. pp. 129-149
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