Molecular basis for G protein control of the prokaryotic ATP sulfurylase

Joseph D. Mougous, Dong H. Lee, Sarah C. Hubbard, Michael W. Schelle, David J. Vocadlo, James M Berger, Carolyn R. Bertozzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Sulfate assimilation is a critical component of both primary and secondary metabolism. An essential step in this pathway is the activation of sulfate through adenylation by the enzyme ATP sulfurylase (ATPS), forming adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate (APS). Proteobacterial ATPS overcomes this energetically unfavorable reaction by associating with a regulatory G protein, coupling the energy of GTP hydrolysis to APS formation. To discover the molecular basis of this unusual role for a G protein, we biochemically characterized and solved the X-ray crystal structure of a complex between Pseudomonas syringae ATPS (CysD) and its associated regulatory G protein (CysN). The structure of CysN•D shows the two proteins in tight association; however, the nucleotides bound to each subunit are spatially segregated. We provide evidence that conserved switch motifs in the G domain of CysN allosterically mediate interactions between the nucleotide binding sites. This structure suggests a molecular mechanism by which conserved G domain architecture is used to energetically link GTP turnover to the production of an essential metabolite.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)109-122
Number of pages14
JournalMolecular Cell
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 6 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Sulfate Adenylyltransferase
Adenosine Phosphosulfate
GTP-Binding Proteins
Guanosine Triphosphate
Sulfates
Nucleotides
Secondary Metabolism
Pseudomonas syringae
Hydrolysis
Binding Sites
X-Rays
Enzymes
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Mougous, J. D., Lee, D. H., Hubbard, S. C., Schelle, M. W., Vocadlo, D. J., Berger, J. M., & Bertozzi, C. R. (2006). Molecular basis for G protein control of the prokaryotic ATP sulfurylase. Molecular Cell, 21(1), 109-122. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.molcel.2005.10.034

Molecular basis for G protein control of the prokaryotic ATP sulfurylase. / Mougous, Joseph D.; Lee, Dong H.; Hubbard, Sarah C.; Schelle, Michael W.; Vocadlo, David J.; Berger, James M; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

In: Molecular Cell, Vol. 21, No. 1, 06.01.2006, p. 109-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mougous, JD, Lee, DH, Hubbard, SC, Schelle, MW, Vocadlo, DJ, Berger, JM & Bertozzi, CR 2006, 'Molecular basis for G protein control of the prokaryotic ATP sulfurylase', Molecular Cell, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 109-122. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.molcel.2005.10.034
Mougous, Joseph D. ; Lee, Dong H. ; Hubbard, Sarah C. ; Schelle, Michael W. ; Vocadlo, David J. ; Berger, James M ; Bertozzi, Carolyn R. / Molecular basis for G protein control of the prokaryotic ATP sulfurylase. In: Molecular Cell. 2006 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 109-122.
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