Molecular basis for discriminating between normal and damaged bases by the human alkyladenine glycosylase AAG

Albert Y Lau, Michael D. Wyatt, Brian J. Glassner, Leona D. Samson, Tom Ellenberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The human 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase [alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG)] catalyzes the first step of base excision repair by cleaving damaged bases from DNA. Unlike other DNA glycosylases that are specific for a particular type of damaged base, AAG excises a chemically diverse selection of substrate bases damaged by alkylation or deamination. The 2.1-A crystal structure of AAG complexed to DNA containing 1,N6-ethenoadenine suggests how modified bases can be distinguished from normal DNA bases in the enzyme active site. Mutational analyses of residues contacting the alkylated base in the crystal structures suggest that the shape of the damaged base, its hydrogen-bonding characteristics, and its aromaticity all contribute to the selective recognition of damage by AAG.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13573-13578
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume97
Issue number25
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 5 2000
Externally publishedYes

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3-methyladenine-DNA glycosylase
DNA
DNA Glycosylases
Deamination
Alkylation
Hydrogen Bonding
DNA Repair
Catalytic Domain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

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Molecular basis for discriminating between normal and damaged bases by the human alkyladenine glycosylase AAG. / Lau, Albert Y; Wyatt, Michael D.; Glassner, Brian J.; Samson, Leona D.; Ellenberger, Tom.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 97, No. 25, 05.12.2000, p. 13573-13578.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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