Modulating effect of dietary carbohydrate supplementation on Candida albicans colonization and invasion in a neutropenic mouse model

S. L. Vargas, C. C. Patrick, G. D. Ayers, W. T. Hughes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We studied the effect of dietary carbohydrate supplementation on Candida albicans colonization and invasion of the gastrointestinal tract in a neutropenic mouse model. Mice inoculated with C. albicans were allowed free access to standard chow and drinking water supplemented with either glucose or xylitol or no carbohydrates (control). On days 33 through 36 postinoculation, the mean ± standard error log10 CFU of C. albicans per gram on the mucosal surface, determined by quantitating CFU dislodged in the first wash of the gastric wall, was significantly higher in mice given the glucose supplement: 7.20 ± 0.09 (glucose) versus 5.38 ± 0.28 (xylitol) and 5.11 ± 0.33 (control) CFU/g (P ≤ 0.05 for each comparison by Fisher's protected least-significant-difference test). Fecal cultures also yielded the highest quantities of C. albicans in the glucose group. Invasion of the gastric wall by C. albicans correlated well with surface colonization in glucose-supplemented animals. Eight of 10 mice in this group, all with >106 CFU/g, showed extensive invasive growth, as compared with only 2 of 26 mice in the remaining groups (P = 0.00006 by Fisher's exact test). These results indicate that dietary glucose intake is a key determinant of C. albicans growth in the gastrointestinal tract. The data provide an experimental rationale for clinical trials to decrease the intake of glucose or its utilization by C. albicans in immunocompromised patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)619-626
Number of pages8
JournalInfection and Immunity
Volume61
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

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Dietary Carbohydrates
Dietary Supplements
Candida albicans
Glucose
Xylitol
Gastrointestinal Tract
Stomach
Immunocompromised Host
Growth
Drinking Water
Carbohydrates
Clinical Trials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

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Modulating effect of dietary carbohydrate supplementation on Candida albicans colonization and invasion in a neutropenic mouse model. / Vargas, S. L.; Patrick, C. C.; Ayers, G. D.; Hughes, W. T.

In: Infection and Immunity, Vol. 61, No. 2, 1993, p. 619-626.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vargas, S. L. ; Patrick, C. C. ; Ayers, G. D. ; Hughes, W. T. / Modulating effect of dietary carbohydrate supplementation on Candida albicans colonization and invasion in a neutropenic mouse model. In: Infection and Immunity. 1993 ; Vol. 61, No. 2. pp. 619-626.
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