Modified map-seeking circuit: Use of computer-aided detection in locating postoperative retained foreign bodies

Bolanle Asiyanbola, Chao Cheng-Wu, Jonathan S. Lewin, Ralph Etienne-Cummings

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: More than 98% of intra-operative X-rays taken to search for postoperative retained foreign bodies (RFBs) have negative findings; in over 30% of cases of such X-rays, the finding is a false negative. Newer technologies created to find RFBs must not only reduce the false-negative rate, but also must not increase the burden of detecting RFBs. We have introduced the use of computer-aided detection (CAD) to facilitate the detection of RFBs on X-rays utilizing a modified version of map-seeking circuit (MSC) algorithm the referenced map-seeking circuit (RMSC), for our proof-of-concept study for detection of needles in plain abdominal X-rays. Methods: Images were obtained by using a portable cassette-based X-ray machine and a C-arm (digital) machine, both of which are commonly used in the operating room. The images obtained using these machines were divided into subimages of approximately 250 × 250 pixels each, for a total of 455 subimages from the cassette-based machine (A) and 365 from the digital machine (B) for use as test samples. Images obtained from A and B were analyzed separately using our modified MSC algorithm with a minimum (τ = 0) and a maximum threshold (τ = 0.5). Results: The automated detection rate (positive predictive value) was 86%, with a false positive/negative rate of 10% to 15% when τ was zero. Conclusion: The CAD-based RMSC algorithm has the potential to improve the accuracy with which RFBs can be found in X-rays. Further research is needed to optimize the detection rate and to identify a wider range of RFBs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume175
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 15 2012

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Foreign Bodies
X-Rays
Operating Rooms
Needles
Technology
Research

Keywords

  • computer aided detection
  • machine learning
  • map seeking circuit
  • retained foreign bodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Modified map-seeking circuit : Use of computer-aided detection in locating postoperative retained foreign bodies. / Asiyanbola, Bolanle; Cheng-Wu, Chao; Lewin, Jonathan S.; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 175, No. 2, 15.06.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Asiyanbola, Bolanle ; Cheng-Wu, Chao ; Lewin, Jonathan S. ; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph. / Modified map-seeking circuit : Use of computer-aided detection in locating postoperative retained foreign bodies. In: Journal of Surgical Research. 2012 ; Vol. 175, No. 2.
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abstract = "Background: More than 98{\%} of intra-operative X-rays taken to search for postoperative retained foreign bodies (RFBs) have negative findings; in over 30{\%} of cases of such X-rays, the finding is a false negative. Newer technologies created to find RFBs must not only reduce the false-negative rate, but also must not increase the burden of detecting RFBs. We have introduced the use of computer-aided detection (CAD) to facilitate the detection of RFBs on X-rays utilizing a modified version of map-seeking circuit (MSC) algorithm the referenced map-seeking circuit (RMSC), for our proof-of-concept study for detection of needles in plain abdominal X-rays. Methods: Images were obtained by using a portable cassette-based X-ray machine and a C-arm (digital) machine, both of which are commonly used in the operating room. The images obtained using these machines were divided into subimages of approximately 250 × 250 pixels each, for a total of 455 subimages from the cassette-based machine (A) and 365 from the digital machine (B) for use as test samples. Images obtained from A and B were analyzed separately using our modified MSC algorithm with a minimum (τ = 0) and a maximum threshold (τ = 0.5). Results: The automated detection rate (positive predictive value) was 86{\%}, with a false positive/negative rate of 10{\%} to 15{\%} when τ was zero. Conclusion: The CAD-based RMSC algorithm has the potential to improve the accuracy with which RFBs can be found in X-rays. Further research is needed to optimize the detection rate and to identify a wider range of RFBs.",
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