Modeling the role of salience in the allocation of overt visual attention

Derrick Parkhurst, Klinton Law, Ernst Niebur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A biologically motivated computational model of bottom-up visual selective attention was used to examine the degree to which stimulus salience guides the allocation of attention. Human eye movements were recorded while participants viewed a series of digitized images of complex natural and artificial scenes. Stimulus dependence of attention, as measured by the correlation between computed stimulus salience and fixation locations, was found to be significantly greater than that expected by chance alone and furthermore was greatest for eye movements that immediately follow stimulus onset. The ability to guide attention of three modeled stimulus features (color, intensity and orientation) was examined and found to vary with image type. Additionally, the effect of the drop in visual sensitivity as a function of eccentricity on stimulus salience was examined, modeled, and shown to be an important determiner of attentional allocation. Overall, the results indicate that stimulus-driven, bottom-up mechanisms contribute significantly to attentional guidance under natural viewing conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)107-123
Number of pages17
JournalVision Research
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

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Keywords

  • Computational model
  • Eye movements
  • Natural images
  • Salience
  • Visual attention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

Modeling the role of salience in the allocation of overt visual attention. / Parkhurst, Derrick; Law, Klinton; Niebur, Ernst.

In: Vision Research, Vol. 42, No. 1, 2002, p. 107-123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Parkhurst, Derrick ; Law, Klinton ; Niebur, Ernst. / Modeling the role of salience in the allocation of overt visual attention. In: Vision Research. 2002 ; Vol. 42, No. 1. pp. 107-123.
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