Modeling hurricane-induced building downtime

Gonzalo Pita, Judith Mitrani-Reiser

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Building downtime is the period of time after a weather disaster in which a building is unusable; it is defined in this paper for a single building as the amount of time between the occurrence of a hurricane event and the completion of all repairs. The loss of function of buildings burdens households, adds stress to an impacted community, and delays the recovery process. Among many primary and secondary effects induced by hurricane damage, building downtime is one of the most difficult to assess. Several activities might exacerbate building downtime such as: building damage inspections and forcible closures, securing funds for repairs, procurement of permits, construction bidding, long lead times for replacement of special equipment, and the time for building repairs. This paper develops a methodology to estimate the downtime of residential buildings as a function of wind speed that is conditioned on exterior and interior damage. This methodology includes the mobilization time before repairs begin conditioned on forcible closure, the repair times of damaged structural and nonstructural components, and change-of-trade delays. The downtime assessment procedure is applied to a case-study region in southern Florida.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication12th Americas Conference on Wind Engineering 2013, ACWE 2013
Subtitle of host publicationWind Effects on Structures, Communities, and Energy Generation
Pages1480-1490
Number of pages11
StatePublished - Dec 1 2013
Event12th Americas Conference on Wind Engineering 2013: Wind Effects on Structures, Communities, and Energy Generation, ACWE 2013 - Seattle, WA, United States
Duration: Jun 16 2013Jun 20 2013

Publication series

Name12th Americas Conference on Wind Engineering 2013, ACWE 2013: Wind Effects on Structures, Communities, and Energy Generation
Volume3

Conference

Conference12th Americas Conference on Wind Engineering 2013: Wind Effects on Structures, Communities, and Energy Generation, ACWE 2013
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle, WA
Period6/16/136/20/13

Keywords

  • Downtimes
  • Hurricane hazard
  • Hurricane risk
  • Mitigation
  • Vulnerability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment

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