Mobile applications for weight management: Theory-based content analysis

Kristen M.J. Azar, Lenard I. Lesser, Brian Y. Laing, Janna Stephens, Magi S. Aurora, Lora E. Burke, Latha P. Palaniappan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background The use of smartphone applications (apps) to assist with weight management is increasingly prevalent, but the quality of these apps is not well characterized. Purpose The goal of the study was to evaluate diet/nutrition and anthropometric tracking apps based on incorporation of features consistent with theories of behavior change. Methods A comparative, descriptive assessment was conducted of the top-rated free apps in the Health and Fitness category available in the iTunes App Store. Health and Fitness apps (N=200) were evaluated using predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria and categorized based on commonality in functionality, features, and developer description. Four researchers then evaluated the two most popular apps in each category using two instruments: one based on traditional behavioral theory (score range: 0-100) and the other on the Fogg Behavioral Model (score range: 0-6). Data collection and analysis occurred in November 2012. Results Eligible apps (n=23) were divided into five categories: (1) diet tracking; (2) healthy cooking; (3) weight/anthropometric tracking; (4) grocery decision making; and (5) restaurant decision making. The mean behavioral theory score was 8.1 (SD=4.2); the mean persuasive technology score was 1.9 (SD=1.7). The top-rated app on both scales was Lose It! by Fitnow Inc. Conclusions All apps received low overall scores for inclusion of behavioral theory-based strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)583-589
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of preventive medicine
Volume45
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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