Mitochondrial subversion in cancer

Aditi Chatterjee, Santanu Dasgupta, David Sidransky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Mitochondria control essential cellular activities including generation of ATP via oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in the regulatory D-loop region and somatic mtDNA mutations are common in primary human cancers. The biological impact of a given mutation may vary, depending on the nature of the mutation and the proportion of mutant mtDNAs carried by the cell. Identification of mtDNA mutations in precancerous lesions supports their early contribution to cell transformation and cancer progression. Introduction of mtDNA mutations in transformed cells has been associated with increased ROS production and tumor growth. Studies reveal that increased and altered mtDNA plays a role in the development of cancer but further work is required to establish the functional significance of specific mitochondrialmutations in cancer and disease progression. This reviewoffers some insight into the extent of mtDNA mutations, their functional consequences in tumorigenesis, mitochondrial therapeutics, and future clinical application.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)638-654
Number of pages17
JournalCancer Prevention Research
Volume4
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

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Mitochondrial DNA
Mutation
Neoplasms
Oxidative Phosphorylation
Disease Progression
Mitochondria
Carcinogenesis
Adenosine Triphosphate
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Mitochondrial subversion in cancer. / Chatterjee, Aditi; Dasgupta, Santanu; Sidransky, David.

In: Cancer Prevention Research, Vol. 4, No. 5, 05.2011, p. 638-654.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chatterjee, Aditi ; Dasgupta, Santanu ; Sidransky, David. / Mitochondrial subversion in cancer. In: Cancer Prevention Research. 2011 ; Vol. 4, No. 5. pp. 638-654.
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