M.I.T./Canadian vestibular experiments on the Spacelab-1 mission: 2. Visual vestibular tilt interaction in weightlessness

L. R. Young, M. Shelhamer, S. Modestino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Adaptation to weightlessness includes the substitution of other sensory signals for the no longer appropriate graviceptor information concerning static spatial orientation. Visual-vestibular interaction producing roll circularvection was studied in weightlessness to assess the influence of otolith cues on spatial orientation. Preliminary results from four subjects tested on Spacelab-1 indicate that visual orientation effects were stronger in weightlessness than pre-flight. The rod and frame test of visual field dependence showed a weak post-flight increase in visual influence. Localized tactile cues applied to the feet in space reduced subjective vection strength.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)299-307
Number of pages9
JournalExperimental Brain Research
Volume64
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1986

Keywords

  • Space
  • Vection
  • Vestibular
  • Visual vestibular interaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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