Minoxidil inhibits proliferation and migration of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells and neointimal formation after balloon catheter injury

Zhihe Li, Cynthia Nater, James Kinsella, Francis Chrest, Edward G. Lakatta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The goal of the study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo inhibition of minoxidil on smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation and migration as well as neointimal formation. The in vitro effect of minoxidil was investigated by Boyden chamber assay and cell-cycle analysis. To evaluate the in vivo effect, we treated the animals with minoxidil in their drinking water before and after balloon catheter injury to carotid artery. Results showed that minoxidil inhibited SMC migration across type I collagen membrane in a dose-related manner (13.5% by 0.01 mg/ml; p < 0.05; 16.8% by 0.05 mg/ml; p < 0.01; 40.4% by 0.25 mg/ml; p < 0.001; and 65.8% by 1.25 mg/ml; p < 0.001). Minoxidil (0.8 mg/ml) increased the number of SMCs in G1 phase (p < 0.05) and decreased the number of SMCs in S phase (p < 0.001). In vivo minoxidil treatment reduced neointimal mass by 31.7% (120 mg/L) and 42.3% (200 mg/L), respectively. Data demonstrate that minoxidil inhibits vascular SMC proliferation and migration both in vitro and in vivo, and therefore may be useful to inhibit SMC hyperplasia that occurs in restenosis and other vascular diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)270-276
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of cardiovascular pharmacology
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Migration
  • Minoxidil
  • Neointima
  • Smooth muscle cell

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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