Minireview: Genetic models for the study of gonadotropin actions

Kathleen Burns, Martin M. Matzuk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Fertility in both sexes relies on complex physiological and molecular processes with many levels of regulation, and our ability to alter the mammalian genome using transgenic technology has greatly enhanced our understanding of these processes. There are numerous commonalities in human and mouse physiology, and the list of mouse models recapitulating recognized and idiopathic human reproductive defects is growing at an ever-increasing rate. In this review, we focus on genetic models of gonadotropin actions, summarizing features of transgenic mice that phenocopy defects in gonadotropin production and gonadotropin receptor responses seen in patients. In addition, we provide examples of mouse models with genetic alterations influencing pituitary FSH and LH production and their effects. These include: 1) transgenic mice with aberrations in steroid hormone, inhibin, and activin feedback pathways; 2) knockouts that demonstrate specific in vivo functions of pituitary transcription factors; and 3) models with alterations in other pituitary hormones, IGF-1, and leptin signaling pathways, which affect both the central and peripheral endocrine axis. What we have to learn from these and other models will continue to revise our conceptions of physiology, identify new targets for contraception, and improve our tools for understanding, diagnosing, and treating cases of human endocrinopathies and pathologies of the reproductive tissues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2823-2835
Number of pages13
JournalEndocrinology
Volume143
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Genetic Models
Gonadotropins
Transgenic Mice
Gonadotropin Receptors
Physiological Phenomena
Activins
Inhibins
Pituitary Hormones
Leptin
Contraception
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
Fertility
Transcription Factors
Steroids
Genome
Hormones
Pathology
Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Minireview : Genetic models for the study of gonadotropin actions. / Burns, Kathleen; Matzuk, Martin M.

In: Endocrinology, Vol. 143, No. 8, 2002, p. 2823-2835.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burns, Kathleen ; Matzuk, Martin M. / Minireview : Genetic models for the study of gonadotropin actions. In: Endocrinology. 2002 ; Vol. 143, No. 8. pp. 2823-2835.
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