Minimum amount of physical activity for reduced mortality and extended life expectancy: A prospective cohort study

Chi Pang Wen, Jackson Pui Man Wai, Min Kuang Tsai, Yi Chen Yang, Ting Yuan David Cheng, Meng Chih Lee, Hui Ting Chan, Chwen Keng Tsao, Shan Pou Tsai, Xifeng Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The health benefits of leisure-time physical activity are well known, but whether less exercise than the recommended 150 min a week can have life expectancy benefits is unclear. We assessed the health benefits of a range of volumes of physical activity in a Taiwanese population. In this prospective cohort study, 416 175 individuals (199 265 men and 216 910 women) participated in a standard medical screening programme in Taiwan between 1996 and 2008, with an average follow-up of 8·05 years (SD 4·21). On the basis of the amount of weekly exercise indicated in a self-administered questionnaire, participants were placed into one of five categories of exercise volumes: inactive, or low, medium, high, or very high activity. We calculated hazard ratios (HR) for mortality risks for every group compared with the inactive group, and calculated life expectancy for every group. Compared with individuals in the inactive group, those in the low-volume activity group, who exercised for an average of 92 min per week (95 CI 71-112) or 15 min a day (SD 1·8), had a 14 reduced risk of all-cause mortality (0·86, 0·81-0·91), and had a 3 year longer life expectancy. Every additional 15 min of daily exercise beyond the minimum amount of 15 min a day further reduced all-cause mortality by 4 (95 CI 2·5-7·0) and all-cancer mortality by 1 (0·3-4·5). These benefits were applicable to all age groups and both sexes, and to those with cardiovascular disease risks. Individuals who were inactive had a 17 (HR 1·17, 95 CI 1·10-1·24) increased risk of mortality compared with individuals in the low-volume group. 15 min a day or 90 min a week of moderate-intensity exercise might be of benefit, even for individuals at risk of cardiovascular disease. Taiwan Department of Health Clinical Trial and Research Center of Excellence and National Health Research Institutes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1244-1253
Number of pages10
JournalThe Lancet
Volume378
Issue number9798
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Life Expectancy
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Exercise
Mortality
Insurance Benefits
Taiwan
Cardiovascular Diseases
Leisure Activities
Health
Age Groups
Odds Ratio
Clinical Trials
Research
Population
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Wen, C. P., Wai, J. P. M., Tsai, M. K., Yang, Y. C., Cheng, T. Y. D., Lee, M. C., ... Wu, X. (2011). Minimum amount of physical activity for reduced mortality and extended life expectancy: A prospective cohort study. The Lancet, 378(9798), 1244-1253. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(11)60749-6

Minimum amount of physical activity for reduced mortality and extended life expectancy : A prospective cohort study. / Wen, Chi Pang; Wai, Jackson Pui Man; Tsai, Min Kuang; Yang, Yi Chen; Cheng, Ting Yuan David; Lee, Meng Chih; Chan, Hui Ting; Tsao, Chwen Keng; Tsai, Shan Pou; Wu, Xifeng.

In: The Lancet, Vol. 378, No. 9798, 01.10.2011, p. 1244-1253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wen, CP, Wai, JPM, Tsai, MK, Yang, YC, Cheng, TYD, Lee, MC, Chan, HT, Tsao, CK, Tsai, SP & Wu, X 2011, 'Minimum amount of physical activity for reduced mortality and extended life expectancy: A prospective cohort study' The Lancet, vol. 378, no. 9798, pp. 1244-1253. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(11)60749-6
Wen, Chi Pang ; Wai, Jackson Pui Man ; Tsai, Min Kuang ; Yang, Yi Chen ; Cheng, Ting Yuan David ; Lee, Meng Chih ; Chan, Hui Ting ; Tsao, Chwen Keng ; Tsai, Shan Pou ; Wu, Xifeng. / Minimum amount of physical activity for reduced mortality and extended life expectancy : A prospective cohort study. In: The Lancet. 2011 ; Vol. 378, No. 9798. pp. 1244-1253.
@article{5c8f8ecbafb34178bc8d6d43662d679c,
title = "Minimum amount of physical activity for reduced mortality and extended life expectancy: A prospective cohort study",
abstract = "The health benefits of leisure-time physical activity are well known, but whether less exercise than the recommended 150 min a week can have life expectancy benefits is unclear. We assessed the health benefits of a range of volumes of physical activity in a Taiwanese population. In this prospective cohort study, 416 175 individuals (199 265 men and 216 910 women) participated in a standard medical screening programme in Taiwan between 1996 and 2008, with an average follow-up of 8·05 years (SD 4·21). On the basis of the amount of weekly exercise indicated in a self-administered questionnaire, participants were placed into one of five categories of exercise volumes: inactive, or low, medium, high, or very high activity. We calculated hazard ratios (HR) for mortality risks for every group compared with the inactive group, and calculated life expectancy for every group. Compared with individuals in the inactive group, those in the low-volume activity group, who exercised for an average of 92 min per week (95 CI 71-112) or 15 min a day (SD 1·8), had a 14 reduced risk of all-cause mortality (0·86, 0·81-0·91), and had a 3 year longer life expectancy. Every additional 15 min of daily exercise beyond the minimum amount of 15 min a day further reduced all-cause mortality by 4 (95 CI 2·5-7·0) and all-cancer mortality by 1 (0·3-4·5). These benefits were applicable to all age groups and both sexes, and to those with cardiovascular disease risks. Individuals who were inactive had a 17 (HR 1·17, 95 CI 1·10-1·24) increased risk of mortality compared with individuals in the low-volume group. 15 min a day or 90 min a week of moderate-intensity exercise might be of benefit, even for individuals at risk of cardiovascular disease. Taiwan Department of Health Clinical Trial and Research Center of Excellence and National Health Research Institutes.",
author = "Wen, {Chi Pang} and Wai, {Jackson Pui Man} and Tsai, {Min Kuang} and Yang, {Yi Chen} and Cheng, {Ting Yuan David} and Lee, {Meng Chih} and Chan, {Hui Ting} and Tsao, {Chwen Keng} and Tsai, {Shan Pou} and Xifeng Wu",
year = "2011",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0140-6736(11)60749-6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "378",
pages = "1244--1253",
journal = "The Lancet",
issn = "0140-6736",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "9798",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Minimum amount of physical activity for reduced mortality and extended life expectancy

T2 - A prospective cohort study

AU - Wen, Chi Pang

AU - Wai, Jackson Pui Man

AU - Tsai, Min Kuang

AU - Yang, Yi Chen

AU - Cheng, Ting Yuan David

AU - Lee, Meng Chih

AU - Chan, Hui Ting

AU - Tsao, Chwen Keng

AU - Tsai, Shan Pou

AU - Wu, Xifeng

PY - 2011/10/1

Y1 - 2011/10/1

N2 - The health benefits of leisure-time physical activity are well known, but whether less exercise than the recommended 150 min a week can have life expectancy benefits is unclear. We assessed the health benefits of a range of volumes of physical activity in a Taiwanese population. In this prospective cohort study, 416 175 individuals (199 265 men and 216 910 women) participated in a standard medical screening programme in Taiwan between 1996 and 2008, with an average follow-up of 8·05 years (SD 4·21). On the basis of the amount of weekly exercise indicated in a self-administered questionnaire, participants were placed into one of five categories of exercise volumes: inactive, or low, medium, high, or very high activity. We calculated hazard ratios (HR) for mortality risks for every group compared with the inactive group, and calculated life expectancy for every group. Compared with individuals in the inactive group, those in the low-volume activity group, who exercised for an average of 92 min per week (95 CI 71-112) or 15 min a day (SD 1·8), had a 14 reduced risk of all-cause mortality (0·86, 0·81-0·91), and had a 3 year longer life expectancy. Every additional 15 min of daily exercise beyond the minimum amount of 15 min a day further reduced all-cause mortality by 4 (95 CI 2·5-7·0) and all-cancer mortality by 1 (0·3-4·5). These benefits were applicable to all age groups and both sexes, and to those with cardiovascular disease risks. Individuals who were inactive had a 17 (HR 1·17, 95 CI 1·10-1·24) increased risk of mortality compared with individuals in the low-volume group. 15 min a day or 90 min a week of moderate-intensity exercise might be of benefit, even for individuals at risk of cardiovascular disease. Taiwan Department of Health Clinical Trial and Research Center of Excellence and National Health Research Institutes.

AB - The health benefits of leisure-time physical activity are well known, but whether less exercise than the recommended 150 min a week can have life expectancy benefits is unclear. We assessed the health benefits of a range of volumes of physical activity in a Taiwanese population. In this prospective cohort study, 416 175 individuals (199 265 men and 216 910 women) participated in a standard medical screening programme in Taiwan between 1996 and 2008, with an average follow-up of 8·05 years (SD 4·21). On the basis of the amount of weekly exercise indicated in a self-administered questionnaire, participants were placed into one of five categories of exercise volumes: inactive, or low, medium, high, or very high activity. We calculated hazard ratios (HR) for mortality risks for every group compared with the inactive group, and calculated life expectancy for every group. Compared with individuals in the inactive group, those in the low-volume activity group, who exercised for an average of 92 min per week (95 CI 71-112) or 15 min a day (SD 1·8), had a 14 reduced risk of all-cause mortality (0·86, 0·81-0·91), and had a 3 year longer life expectancy. Every additional 15 min of daily exercise beyond the minimum amount of 15 min a day further reduced all-cause mortality by 4 (95 CI 2·5-7·0) and all-cancer mortality by 1 (0·3-4·5). These benefits were applicable to all age groups and both sexes, and to those with cardiovascular disease risks. Individuals who were inactive had a 17 (HR 1·17, 95 CI 1·10-1·24) increased risk of mortality compared with individuals in the low-volume group. 15 min a day or 90 min a week of moderate-intensity exercise might be of benefit, even for individuals at risk of cardiovascular disease. Taiwan Department of Health Clinical Trial and Research Center of Excellence and National Health Research Institutes.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80053563435&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80053563435&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0140-6736(11)60749-6

DO - 10.1016/S0140-6736(11)60749-6

M3 - Article

VL - 378

SP - 1244

EP - 1253

JO - The Lancet

JF - The Lancet

SN - 0140-6736

IS - 9798

ER -