MINIMAL NEUROLINGUISTIC MODEL AND ITS LESSONS.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Impairments in object naming have contributed to a view held in neurology that many higher brain functions can be understood as the result of sequential stages of processing connected by limited-channel pathways. However, this standard model cannot readily account for some specific types of impairments, nor for important variables such as speed. The author reinterpreted the classic functional/neuroanatomic stages as examples of distributed, parallel processing in neural networks with massively parallel interconnections. Simulated 'lesions' between the stages of this model could reproduce the impairment of real patients with such (presumed) lesions. Such models have to be strongly considered in understanding higher cerebral function and its disorders; empirical testing and future directions are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - Annual Symposium on Computer Applications in Medical Care
EditorsMichael J. Ackerman
PublisherIEEE
Pages248-251
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)0818606479
StatePublished - Dec 1 1985

Publication series

NameProceedings - Annual Symposium on Computer Applications in Medical Care
ISSN (Print)0195-4210

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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  • Cite this

    Gordon, B. (1985). MINIMAL NEUROLINGUISTIC MODEL AND ITS LESSONS. In M. J. Ackerman (Ed.), Proceedings - Annual Symposium on Computer Applications in Medical Care (pp. 248-251). (Proceedings - Annual Symposium on Computer Applications in Medical Care). IEEE.