Mini-incision total knee arthroplasty can increase risk of component malalignment

David F. Dalury, Douglas A. Dennis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Interest in minimal-incision total knee arthroplasty has increased in recent years. We compared a group of 30 patients who had total knee arthroplasty with a mini-incision to a similar group of 30 patients who had total knee arthroplasty with a standard length incision. The minimal-incision group had some minor early advantages (less pain medication use, earlier improvement in range of motion), but these advantages dissipated by 3 months followup. Radiographic evaluations showed that four of the 30 patients with minimal incisions had tibial component varus malalignment (< 87°), whereas no patients with the standard length incision had malalignment. Although total knee arthroplasty performed using a minimal incision may provide some early advantages, minimal incisions can impede a surgeon's vision and may influence component alignment and possibly compromise long-term outcome. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic study, Level III-1 (retrospective comparative study).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-81
Number of pages5
JournalClinical orthopaedics and related research
Issue number440
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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