Minding the gap

An approach to determine critical drivers in the development of point-of-care diagnostics

Joany Jackman, Manny Uy, Yu-Hsiang Hsieh, Anne Marie Rompalo, Terry Hogan, Jill Huppert, Mary Jett-Goheen, Charlotte A Gaydos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A point-of-care test (POCT) for Chlamydia trachomatis detection is an urgent public health need. Technological advances in diagnostics have made solutions possible. Yet no reliable POCT exists. Our goal was to address the gap between Chlamydia POCT needs and successful POCT development by determining which characteristics of POCTs are most critical and if any flexibility in the attributes assigned those characteristics exists between technology developer and end user. Methods: We used a process known as warfare analysis laboratory exercise (WALEX) in combination with design of experiment methodology using discrete choice experiments to describe the attributes of the most realistic rather than the most ideal POCT. The WALEX was conducted as an interactive oral and simultaneous electronic discussion among experts with differing expertise but linked by a common interest in the development of a Chlamydia POCT. Results: Our studies demonstrated which features of the ideal Chlamydia POCT were considered critical to test acceptance by users and which were open to negotiation. In particular, end users were more lenient on the requirement for the fastest ideal test and the lowest 1-time instrument costs, if the requirement for higher throughput, lowest cost, and vaginal sample source collection was preserved. Design of experiment methods used in forced choice question design provided confirmation of opinions derived from oral and electronic WALEX comments. Conclusions: The WALEX in combination with discrete choice experiment helped us achieve our goal in identifying the gaps in the Chlamydia POCT and in determining the most realistic solutions to bridge those gaps.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)130-139
Number of pages10
JournalPoint of Care
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

Fingerprint

Point-of-Care Systems
Chlamydia
Costs and Cost Analysis
Chlamydia trachomatis
Negotiating
Public Health
Technology

Keywords

  • Chlamydia trachomatis
  • design of experiments
  • discrete choice experiment
  • Point-of-care test
  • sexually transmitted infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Minding the gap : An approach to determine critical drivers in the development of point-of-care diagnostics. / Jackman, Joany; Uy, Manny; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Rompalo, Anne Marie; Hogan, Terry; Huppert, Jill; Jett-Goheen, Mary; Gaydos, Charlotte A.

In: Point of Care, Vol. 11, No. 2, 06.2012, p. 130-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jackman, Joany ; Uy, Manny ; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang ; Rompalo, Anne Marie ; Hogan, Terry ; Huppert, Jill ; Jett-Goheen, Mary ; Gaydos, Charlotte A. / Minding the gap : An approach to determine critical drivers in the development of point-of-care diagnostics. In: Point of Care. 2012 ; Vol. 11, No. 2. pp. 130-139.
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