Military target task performance after wavefront-guided (WFG) and wavefront-optimized (WFO) photorefractive keratectomy (PRK)

Tana Maurer, Dawne Deaver, Christopher Howell, Steve Moyer, Oanh Nguyen, Greg Mueller, Denise Ryan, Rose K. Sia, Richard Stutzman, Joseph Pasternak, Kraig Bower

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Major decisions regarding life and death are routinely made on the modern battlefield, where visual function of the individual soldier can be of critical importance in the decision-making process. Glasses in the combat environment have considerable disadvantages: degradation of short term visual performance can occur as dust and sweat accumulate on lenses during a mission or patrol; long term visual performance can diminish as lenses become increasingly scratched and pitted; during periods of intense physical trauma, glasses can be knocked off the soldier's face and lost or broken. Although refractive surgery offers certain benefits on the battlefield when compared to wearing glasses, it is not without potential disadvantages. As a byproduct of refractive surgery, elevated optical aberrations can be induced, causing decreases in contrast sensitivity and increases in the symptoms of glare, halos, and starbursts. Typically, these symptoms occur under low light level conditions, the same conditions under which most military operations are initiated. With the advent of wavefront aberrometry, we are now seeing correction not only of myopia and astigmatism but of other, smaller optical aberrations that can cause the above symptoms. In collaboration with the Warfighter Refractive Eye Surgery Program and Research Center (WRESP-RC) at Fort Belvoir and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (WRNMMC), the overall objective of this study is to determine the impact of wavefront guided (WFG) versus wavefront-optimized (WFO) photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) on military task visual performance. Psychophysical perception testing was conducted before and after surgery to measure each participant's performance regarding target detection and identification using thermal imagery. The results are presented here.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
PublisherSPIE
Volume9112
ISBN (Print)9781628410495
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
EventSensing Technologies for Global Health, Military Medicine, and Environmental Monitoring IV - Baltimore, MD, United States
Duration: May 5 2014May 7 2014

Other

OtherSensing Technologies for Global Health, Military Medicine, and Environmental Monitoring IV
CountryUnited States
CityBaltimore, MD
Period5/5/145/7/14

Fingerprint

Wavefronts
surgery
Wave Front
Surgery
Military
Target
Aberrations
Aberration
Glass
Lens
glass
aberration
Lenses
myopia
visual tasks
sweat
lenses
military operations
patrols
glare

Keywords

  • military task performance
  • perception testing
  • photorefractive keratectomy
  • PRK
  • refractive surgery
  • threshold target identification
  • wavefront-guided
  • wavefront-optimized
  • WFG
  • WFO

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Mathematics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Maurer, T., Deaver, D., Howell, C., Moyer, S., Nguyen, O., Mueller, G., ... Bower, K. (2014). Military target task performance after wavefront-guided (WFG) and wavefront-optimized (WFO) photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 9112). [91120U] SPIE. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2050309

Military target task performance after wavefront-guided (WFG) and wavefront-optimized (WFO) photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). / Maurer, Tana; Deaver, Dawne; Howell, Christopher; Moyer, Steve; Nguyen, Oanh; Mueller, Greg; Ryan, Denise; Sia, Rose K.; Stutzman, Richard; Pasternak, Joseph; Bower, Kraig.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 9112 SPIE, 2014. 91120U.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Maurer, T, Deaver, D, Howell, C, Moyer, S, Nguyen, O, Mueller, G, Ryan, D, Sia, RK, Stutzman, R, Pasternak, J & Bower, K 2014, Military target task performance after wavefront-guided (WFG) and wavefront-optimized (WFO) photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). in Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 9112, 91120U, SPIE, Sensing Technologies for Global Health, Military Medicine, and Environmental Monitoring IV, Baltimore, MD, United States, 5/5/14. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2050309
Maurer T, Deaver D, Howell C, Moyer S, Nguyen O, Mueller G et al. Military target task performance after wavefront-guided (WFG) and wavefront-optimized (WFO) photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 9112. SPIE. 2014. 91120U https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2050309
Maurer, Tana ; Deaver, Dawne ; Howell, Christopher ; Moyer, Steve ; Nguyen, Oanh ; Mueller, Greg ; Ryan, Denise ; Sia, Rose K. ; Stutzman, Richard ; Pasternak, Joseph ; Bower, Kraig. / Military target task performance after wavefront-guided (WFG) and wavefront-optimized (WFO) photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 9112 SPIE, 2014.
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