Mild cognitive impairment, dementia, and their subtypes in oldest old women

Kristine Yaffe, Laura E. Middleton, Li Yung Lui, Adam P Spira, Katie Stone, Caroline Racine, Kristine E. Ensrud, Joel H. Kramer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The population of oldest old is increasing, but the prevalence of cognitive impairment is not well characterized in this group. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), dementia, and their subtypes in oldest old women and to examine whether some groups of oldest old women were more likely to have cognitive impairment. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Women Cognitive Impairment Study of Exceptional Aging. Participants: A total of 1299 oldest old (≥85 years) women. Main Outcome Measures: All the women completed a neuropsychological test battery. Those who screened positive for possible cognitive impairment (n=634) were further assessed for a diagnosis of dementia, MCI, or normal cognition. The remaining women (n=665) were considered cognitively normal. Dementia and MCI subtypes were determined using standard criteria. Results: The women had a meanage of 88.2 years, and 27.0% were 90 years or older; 231 women (17.8%) were diagnosed as having dementia and 301 (23.2%) as having MCI, for a combined cognitive impairment prevalence of 41.0%. Clinical features consistent with Alzheimer disease and mixed dementia were most common, each accounting for 40% of dementia cases. Amnestic multiple domain and nonamnestic single domain were the most common MCI types, accounting for 33.9% and 28.9% of cases, respectively. Cognitive impairment was more frequent in women 90 years or older compared with those 85 to 89 years (dementia, 28.2% vs 13.9%, P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)631-636
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Neurology
Volume68
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

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Dementia
Cognitive Dysfunction
Mild Cognitive Impairment
Neuropsychological Tests
Cognitive Impairment
Cognition
Alzheimer Disease
Cohort Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Yaffe, K., Middleton, L. E., Lui, L. Y., Spira, A. P., Stone, K., Racine, C., ... Kramer, J. H. (2011). Mild cognitive impairment, dementia, and their subtypes in oldest old women. Archives of Neurology, 68(5), 631-636. https://doi.org/10.1001/archneurol.2011.82

Mild cognitive impairment, dementia, and their subtypes in oldest old women. / Yaffe, Kristine; Middleton, Laura E.; Lui, Li Yung; Spira, Adam P; Stone, Katie; Racine, Caroline; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Kramer, Joel H.

In: Archives of Neurology, Vol. 68, No. 5, 05.2011, p. 631-636.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yaffe, K, Middleton, LE, Lui, LY, Spira, AP, Stone, K, Racine, C, Ensrud, KE & Kramer, JH 2011, 'Mild cognitive impairment, dementia, and their subtypes in oldest old women', Archives of Neurology, vol. 68, no. 5, pp. 631-636. https://doi.org/10.1001/archneurol.2011.82
Yaffe, Kristine ; Middleton, Laura E. ; Lui, Li Yung ; Spira, Adam P ; Stone, Katie ; Racine, Caroline ; Ensrud, Kristine E. ; Kramer, Joel H. / Mild cognitive impairment, dementia, and their subtypes in oldest old women. In: Archives of Neurology. 2011 ; Vol. 68, No. 5. pp. 631-636.
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