Mild cognitive impairment and dementia prevalence

The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Neurocognitive Study

David S. Knopman, Rebecca F Gottesman, Albert Richey Sharrett, Lisa M. Wruck, Beverly Gwen Windham, Laura Coker, Andrea L C Schneider, Sun Hengrui, Alvaro Alonso, Josef Coresh, Marilyn Albert, Thomas H. Mosley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: We examined prevalence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Neurocognitive study. Methods: Beginning in June, 2011, we invited all surviving ARIC participants to undergo cognitive, neurologic, and brain imaging assessments to diagnose MCI or dementia and assign an etiology for the cognitive disorder. Results: Of 10,713 surviving ARIC participants (age range, 69-88 years), we ascertained cognitive diagnoses in 6471 in person, 1966 by telephone interviews (participant or informant), and the remainder by medical record review. The prevalence of dementia was 9.0% and MCI 21%. Alzheimer's disease (AD) was the primary or secondary etiology in 76% of dementia and 75% of MCI participants. Cerebrovascular disease was the primary or secondary etiology in 46% of dementia and 32% of MCI participants. Discussion: MCI and dementia were common among survivors from the original ARIC cohort. Nearly 30% of the ARIC cohort received diagnoses of either dementia or MCI, and for the majority of these individuals, the etiologic basis was attributed to AD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment and Disease Monitoring
Volume2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Dementia
Atherosclerosis
Alzheimer Disease
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Cognitive Dysfunction
Neuroimaging
Nervous System
Medical Records
Survivors
Interviews

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Cerebrovascular disease
  • Dementia
  • Epidemiology
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Prevalence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Mild cognitive impairment and dementia prevalence : The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Neurocognitive Study. / Knopman, David S.; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Sharrett, Albert Richey; Wruck, Lisa M.; Windham, Beverly Gwen; Coker, Laura; Schneider, Andrea L C; Hengrui, Sun; Alonso, Alvaro; Coresh, Josef; Albert, Marilyn; Mosley, Thomas H.

In: Alzheimer's and Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment and Disease Monitoring, Vol. 2, 2016, p. 1-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Knopman, David S. ; Gottesman, Rebecca F ; Sharrett, Albert Richey ; Wruck, Lisa M. ; Windham, Beverly Gwen ; Coker, Laura ; Schneider, Andrea L C ; Hengrui, Sun ; Alonso, Alvaro ; Coresh, Josef ; Albert, Marilyn ; Mosley, Thomas H. / Mild cognitive impairment and dementia prevalence : The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Neurocognitive Study. In: Alzheimer's and Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment and Disease Monitoring. 2016 ; Vol. 2. pp. 1-11.
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