Migration neighborhoods and networks: Approaches to understanding how urban environmental conditions affect syndemic adverse health outcomes among gay bisexual and other men who have sex with men

James E. Egan, Victoria Frye, Steven P. Kurtz, Carl Latkin, Minxing Chen, Karin Tobin, Cui Yang, Beryl A. Koblin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Adopting socioecological intersectionality and lifecourse theoretical frameworks may enhance our understanding of the production of syndemic adverse health outcomes among gay bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM). From this perspective we present preliminary data from three related studies that suggest ways in which social contexts may influence the health of MSM. The first study using cross-sectional data looked at migration of MSM to the gay resort area of South Florida and found that amount of time lived in the area was associated with risk behaviors and HIV infection. The second study using qualitative interviews observed complex interactions between neighborhood-level social environments and individual-level racial and sexual identity among MSM in New York City. The third study using egocentric network analysis with a sample of African American MSM in Baltimore found that sexual partners were more likely to be found through face-to-face means than the Internet. They also observed that those who coresided with a sex partner had larger networks of people to depend on for social and financial support but had the same size sexual networks as those who did not live with a partner. Overall these findings suggest the need for further investigation into the role of macro-level social forces on the emotional behavioral and physical health of urban MSM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S35-S50
JournalAIDS and behavior
Volume15
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

Keywords

  • Homosexuality
  • Male
  • Social environment
  • Urban health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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