Migraine headaches are not associated with a unique depressive symptom profile: Results from the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study

Amanda Kalaydjian, William Eaton, Peter Zandi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: There is a well-established link between migraine headaches and depression. However, it is unclear whether individuals with migraine experience a unique profile of depressive symptoms in comparison to individuals without migraine. Methods: This question was addressed using data from the Baltimore cohort of the Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study. The cross-sectional association between migraine headaches and each depressive symptom was calculated using logistic regression, and symptom profiles among those with migraine headaches (n=249) and those without (n=1480) were compared using generalized estimating equations. Results: Migraine headaches were associated with increased odds of reporting seven of nine depressive symptom groups by a factor of roughly 2. However, when the symptom profiles were compared, individuals with migraine headaches did not differ in their profile of symptoms. Conclusion: These results suggest that individuals with migraine headaches are more likely to report depressive symptoms but do not display a unique profile of symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-129
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Psychosomatic Research
Volume63
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2007

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Headache
  • Migraine
  • Severity
  • Suicide
  • Symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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