Migraine and retinal microvascular abnormalities: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

K. M. Rose, T. Y. Wong, A. P. Carson, D. J. Couper, R. Klein, A. R. Sharrett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: This study examined the association between vascular headaches and retinal microvascular disease. METHODS: We investigated the cross-sectional association between headaches (migraine/other headaches with aura, migraine without aura, other headaches without aura, no headaches) and retinal microvascular signs (retinopathy, focal arteriolar narrowing, arteriovenous nicking; arteriolar and venular calibers) among middle-aged African American and white men and women from the third examination of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (1993 through 1995). RESULTS: After controlling for age, gender, race, study center, and cardiovascular risk factors, we determined that persons with headaches were more likely to have retinopathy than those without a history of headaches (odds ratio [OR] = 1.38, 95% CI = 0.96 to 1.99 for migraine/other headaches with aura; OR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.05 to 2.12 for migraine without aura; and OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 0.99 to 1.65 for other headaches). Associations with migraine were stronger among the subset of participants without a history of diabetes or hypertension (OR = 1.79, 95% CI = 1.09 to 2.95 for migraine/other headaches with aura; and OR = 1.74, 95% CI = 1.11 to 2.71 for migraine without aura). Headaches were not associated with focal arteriolar narrowing or arteriovenous nicking. Persons with headaches tended to have smaller mean arteriolar and venular calibers; however, these associations did not tend to persist among those without hypertension or diabetes. CONCLUSION: Middle-aged persons with migraine and other headaches were more likely to have retinopathy signs, supporting the hypothesis that neurovascular dysfunction may underlie vascular headaches.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1694-1700
Number of pages7
JournalNeurology
Volume68
Issue number20
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007

Fingerprint

Migraine Disorders
Headache
Atherosclerosis
Odds Ratio
Epilepsy
Vascular Headaches
Migraine without Aura
Hypertension
Migraine with Aura
Retinal Diseases
African Americans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Rose, K. M., Wong, T. Y., Carson, A. P., Couper, D. J., Klein, R., & Sharrett, A. R. (2007). Migraine and retinal microvascular abnormalities: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Neurology, 68(20), 1694-1700. https://doi.org/10.1212/01.wnl.0000261916.42871.05

Migraine and retinal microvascular abnormalities : The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. / Rose, K. M.; Wong, T. Y.; Carson, A. P.; Couper, D. J.; Klein, R.; Sharrett, A. R.

In: Neurology, Vol. 68, No. 20, 05.2007, p. 1694-1700.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rose, KM, Wong, TY, Carson, AP, Couper, DJ, Klein, R & Sharrett, AR 2007, 'Migraine and retinal microvascular abnormalities: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study', Neurology, vol. 68, no. 20, pp. 1694-1700. https://doi.org/10.1212/01.wnl.0000261916.42871.05
Rose, K. M. ; Wong, T. Y. ; Carson, A. P. ; Couper, D. J. ; Klein, R. ; Sharrett, A. R. / Migraine and retinal microvascular abnormalities : The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. In: Neurology. 2007 ; Vol. 68, No. 20. pp. 1694-1700.
@article{dc992db9866b4f538e24df07f687434d,
title = "Migraine and retinal microvascular abnormalities: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: This study examined the association between vascular headaches and retinal microvascular disease. METHODS: We investigated the cross-sectional association between headaches (migraine/other headaches with aura, migraine without aura, other headaches without aura, no headaches) and retinal microvascular signs (retinopathy, focal arteriolar narrowing, arteriovenous nicking; arteriolar and venular calibers) among middle-aged African American and white men and women from the third examination of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (1993 through 1995). RESULTS: After controlling for age, gender, race, study center, and cardiovascular risk factors, we determined that persons with headaches were more likely to have retinopathy than those without a history of headaches (odds ratio [OR] = 1.38, 95{\%} CI = 0.96 to 1.99 for migraine/other headaches with aura; OR = 1.49, 95{\%} CI = 1.05 to 2.12 for migraine without aura; and OR = 1.28, 95{\%} CI = 0.99 to 1.65 for other headaches). Associations with migraine were stronger among the subset of participants without a history of diabetes or hypertension (OR = 1.79, 95{\%} CI = 1.09 to 2.95 for migraine/other headaches with aura; and OR = 1.74, 95{\%} CI = 1.11 to 2.71 for migraine without aura). Headaches were not associated with focal arteriolar narrowing or arteriovenous nicking. Persons with headaches tended to have smaller mean arteriolar and venular calibers; however, these associations did not tend to persist among those without hypertension or diabetes. CONCLUSION: Middle-aged persons with migraine and other headaches were more likely to have retinopathy signs, supporting the hypothesis that neurovascular dysfunction may underlie vascular headaches.",
author = "Rose, {K. M.} and Wong, {T. Y.} and Carson, {A. P.} and Couper, {D. J.} and R. Klein and Sharrett, {A. R.}",
year = "2007",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1212/01.wnl.0000261916.42871.05",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "68",
pages = "1694--1700",
journal = "Neurology",
issn = "0028-3878",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "20",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Migraine and retinal microvascular abnormalities

T2 - The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

AU - Rose, K. M.

AU - Wong, T. Y.

AU - Carson, A. P.

AU - Couper, D. J.

AU - Klein, R.

AU - Sharrett, A. R.

PY - 2007/5

Y1 - 2007/5

N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study examined the association between vascular headaches and retinal microvascular disease. METHODS: We investigated the cross-sectional association between headaches (migraine/other headaches with aura, migraine without aura, other headaches without aura, no headaches) and retinal microvascular signs (retinopathy, focal arteriolar narrowing, arteriovenous nicking; arteriolar and venular calibers) among middle-aged African American and white men and women from the third examination of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (1993 through 1995). RESULTS: After controlling for age, gender, race, study center, and cardiovascular risk factors, we determined that persons with headaches were more likely to have retinopathy than those without a history of headaches (odds ratio [OR] = 1.38, 95% CI = 0.96 to 1.99 for migraine/other headaches with aura; OR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.05 to 2.12 for migraine without aura; and OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 0.99 to 1.65 for other headaches). Associations with migraine were stronger among the subset of participants without a history of diabetes or hypertension (OR = 1.79, 95% CI = 1.09 to 2.95 for migraine/other headaches with aura; and OR = 1.74, 95% CI = 1.11 to 2.71 for migraine without aura). Headaches were not associated with focal arteriolar narrowing or arteriovenous nicking. Persons with headaches tended to have smaller mean arteriolar and venular calibers; however, these associations did not tend to persist among those without hypertension or diabetes. CONCLUSION: Middle-aged persons with migraine and other headaches were more likely to have retinopathy signs, supporting the hypothesis that neurovascular dysfunction may underlie vascular headaches.

AB - OBJECTIVE: This study examined the association between vascular headaches and retinal microvascular disease. METHODS: We investigated the cross-sectional association between headaches (migraine/other headaches with aura, migraine without aura, other headaches without aura, no headaches) and retinal microvascular signs (retinopathy, focal arteriolar narrowing, arteriovenous nicking; arteriolar and venular calibers) among middle-aged African American and white men and women from the third examination of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (1993 through 1995). RESULTS: After controlling for age, gender, race, study center, and cardiovascular risk factors, we determined that persons with headaches were more likely to have retinopathy than those without a history of headaches (odds ratio [OR] = 1.38, 95% CI = 0.96 to 1.99 for migraine/other headaches with aura; OR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.05 to 2.12 for migraine without aura; and OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 0.99 to 1.65 for other headaches). Associations with migraine were stronger among the subset of participants without a history of diabetes or hypertension (OR = 1.79, 95% CI = 1.09 to 2.95 for migraine/other headaches with aura; and OR = 1.74, 95% CI = 1.11 to 2.71 for migraine without aura). Headaches were not associated with focal arteriolar narrowing or arteriovenous nicking. Persons with headaches tended to have smaller mean arteriolar and venular calibers; however, these associations did not tend to persist among those without hypertension or diabetes. CONCLUSION: Middle-aged persons with migraine and other headaches were more likely to have retinopathy signs, supporting the hypothesis that neurovascular dysfunction may underlie vascular headaches.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34248529989&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34248529989&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1212/01.wnl.0000261916.42871.05

DO - 10.1212/01.wnl.0000261916.42871.05

M3 - Article

C2 - 17502551

AN - SCOPUS:34248529989

VL - 68

SP - 1694

EP - 1700

JO - Neurology

JF - Neurology

SN - 0028-3878

IS - 20

ER -