Midlife Physical Activity and Mobility in Older Age. The InCHIANTI Study

Kushang V. Patel, Antonia K. Coppin, Todd M. Manini, Fulvio Lauretani, Stefania Bandinelli, Luigi Ferrucci, Jack M. Guralnik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Among older adults, loss of mobility represents a critical stage in the disablement process, whereby the risk for disability is significantly increased. Physical activity is a modifiable risk factor that is associated with reduced risk of losing mobility in older adulthood; however, few studies have examined physical activity performed earlier in life in relation to mobility later in life. Methods: Data from a population-based study of 1155 adults aged 65 years and older living in the Chianti region of Italy in 1998-2000 were analyzed in 2005 and 2006. Participants retrospectively recalled their physical activity levels in midlife and underwent mobility testing and medical examination. Two objective mobility outcomes were examined as a function of past physical activity: the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) and the ability to walk 400 meters. Results: Older Italian adults (mean age 74.8, standard deviation 7.3) who engaged in higher levels of physical activity in midlife were significantly more likely to perform better on the SPPB than individuals who were less physically active in midlife. In addition, failure to complete the 400-meter walk test was significantly less likely among physically active men (Level II) (odds ratio [OR]=0.37, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.15-0.93) and very active men (Level III) (OR=0.23, 95% CI=0.09-0.63) when compared to men who were less active (Level I) in the past (p for trend, 0.008). These associations remained after adjustment for demographic factors, medical conditions, and physiologic impairments. Conclusions: Older adults who reported higher levels of physical activity in midlife had better mobility in old age than less physically active ones.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)217-224
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Exercise
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Population Growth
Italy
Demography
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Patel, K. V., Coppin, A. K., Manini, T. M., Lauretani, F., Bandinelli, S., Ferrucci, L., & Guralnik, J. M. (2006). Midlife Physical Activity and Mobility in Older Age. The InCHIANTI Study. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 31(3), 217-224. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2006.05.005

Midlife Physical Activity and Mobility in Older Age. The InCHIANTI Study. / Patel, Kushang V.; Coppin, Antonia K.; Manini, Todd M.; Lauretani, Fulvio; Bandinelli, Stefania; Ferrucci, Luigi; Guralnik, Jack M.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 31, No. 3, 09.2006, p. 217-224.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Patel, KV, Coppin, AK, Manini, TM, Lauretani, F, Bandinelli, S, Ferrucci, L & Guralnik, JM 2006, 'Midlife Physical Activity and Mobility in Older Age. The InCHIANTI Study', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 217-224. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2006.05.005
Patel KV, Coppin AK, Manini TM, Lauretani F, Bandinelli S, Ferrucci L et al. Midlife Physical Activity and Mobility in Older Age. The InCHIANTI Study. American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2006 Sep;31(3):217-224. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2006.05.005
Patel, Kushang V. ; Coppin, Antonia K. ; Manini, Todd M. ; Lauretani, Fulvio ; Bandinelli, Stefania ; Ferrucci, Luigi ; Guralnik, Jack M. / Midlife Physical Activity and Mobility in Older Age. The InCHIANTI Study. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2006 ; Vol. 31, No. 3. pp. 217-224.
@article{0edc727c26a446ecb665bef9a17975ce,
title = "Midlife Physical Activity and Mobility in Older Age. The InCHIANTI Study",
abstract = "Background: Among older adults, loss of mobility represents a critical stage in the disablement process, whereby the risk for disability is significantly increased. Physical activity is a modifiable risk factor that is associated with reduced risk of losing mobility in older adulthood; however, few studies have examined physical activity performed earlier in life in relation to mobility later in life. Methods: Data from a population-based study of 1155 adults aged 65 years and older living in the Chianti region of Italy in 1998-2000 were analyzed in 2005 and 2006. Participants retrospectively recalled their physical activity levels in midlife and underwent mobility testing and medical examination. Two objective mobility outcomes were examined as a function of past physical activity: the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) and the ability to walk 400 meters. Results: Older Italian adults (mean age 74.8, standard deviation 7.3) who engaged in higher levels of physical activity in midlife were significantly more likely to perform better on the SPPB than individuals who were less physically active in midlife. In addition, failure to complete the 400-meter walk test was significantly less likely among physically active men (Level II) (odds ratio [OR]=0.37, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI]=0.15-0.93) and very active men (Level III) (OR=0.23, 95{\%} CI=0.09-0.63) when compared to men who were less active (Level I) in the past (p for trend, 0.008). These associations remained after adjustment for demographic factors, medical conditions, and physiologic impairments. Conclusions: Older adults who reported higher levels of physical activity in midlife had better mobility in old age than less physically active ones.",
author = "Patel, {Kushang V.} and Coppin, {Antonia K.} and Manini, {Todd M.} and Fulvio Lauretani and Stefania Bandinelli and Luigi Ferrucci and Guralnik, {Jack M.}",
year = "2006",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1016/j.amepre.2006.05.005",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "31",
pages = "217--224",
journal = "American Journal of Preventive Medicine",
issn = "0749-3797",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Midlife Physical Activity and Mobility in Older Age. The InCHIANTI Study

AU - Patel, Kushang V.

AU - Coppin, Antonia K.

AU - Manini, Todd M.

AU - Lauretani, Fulvio

AU - Bandinelli, Stefania

AU - Ferrucci, Luigi

AU - Guralnik, Jack M.

PY - 2006/9

Y1 - 2006/9

N2 - Background: Among older adults, loss of mobility represents a critical stage in the disablement process, whereby the risk for disability is significantly increased. Physical activity is a modifiable risk factor that is associated with reduced risk of losing mobility in older adulthood; however, few studies have examined physical activity performed earlier in life in relation to mobility later in life. Methods: Data from a population-based study of 1155 adults aged 65 years and older living in the Chianti region of Italy in 1998-2000 were analyzed in 2005 and 2006. Participants retrospectively recalled their physical activity levels in midlife and underwent mobility testing and medical examination. Two objective mobility outcomes were examined as a function of past physical activity: the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) and the ability to walk 400 meters. Results: Older Italian adults (mean age 74.8, standard deviation 7.3) who engaged in higher levels of physical activity in midlife were significantly more likely to perform better on the SPPB than individuals who were less physically active in midlife. In addition, failure to complete the 400-meter walk test was significantly less likely among physically active men (Level II) (odds ratio [OR]=0.37, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.15-0.93) and very active men (Level III) (OR=0.23, 95% CI=0.09-0.63) when compared to men who were less active (Level I) in the past (p for trend, 0.008). These associations remained after adjustment for demographic factors, medical conditions, and physiologic impairments. Conclusions: Older adults who reported higher levels of physical activity in midlife had better mobility in old age than less physically active ones.

AB - Background: Among older adults, loss of mobility represents a critical stage in the disablement process, whereby the risk for disability is significantly increased. Physical activity is a modifiable risk factor that is associated with reduced risk of losing mobility in older adulthood; however, few studies have examined physical activity performed earlier in life in relation to mobility later in life. Methods: Data from a population-based study of 1155 adults aged 65 years and older living in the Chianti region of Italy in 1998-2000 were analyzed in 2005 and 2006. Participants retrospectively recalled their physical activity levels in midlife and underwent mobility testing and medical examination. Two objective mobility outcomes were examined as a function of past physical activity: the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) and the ability to walk 400 meters. Results: Older Italian adults (mean age 74.8, standard deviation 7.3) who engaged in higher levels of physical activity in midlife were significantly more likely to perform better on the SPPB than individuals who were less physically active in midlife. In addition, failure to complete the 400-meter walk test was significantly less likely among physically active men (Level II) (odds ratio [OR]=0.37, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.15-0.93) and very active men (Level III) (OR=0.23, 95% CI=0.09-0.63) when compared to men who were less active (Level I) in the past (p for trend, 0.008). These associations remained after adjustment for demographic factors, medical conditions, and physiologic impairments. Conclusions: Older adults who reported higher levels of physical activity in midlife had better mobility in old age than less physically active ones.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33746969902&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33746969902&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.amepre.2006.05.005

DO - 10.1016/j.amepre.2006.05.005

M3 - Article

VL - 31

SP - 217

EP - 224

JO - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

JF - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

SN - 0749-3797

IS - 3

ER -