Midlife and Late-Life Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Brain Volume Changes in Late Adulthood: Results from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging

Qu Tian, Stephanie A. Studenski, Susan M. Resnick, Christos Davatzikos, Luigi Ferrucci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background. Higher cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is cross-sectionally associated with more conserved brain volume in older age, but longitudinal studies are rare. This study examined whether higher midlife CRF was prospectively associated with slower atrophy, which in turn was associated with higher late-life CRF. Methods. Brain volume by magnetic resonance imaging was determined annually from 1994 to 2003 in 146 participants (M baseline age = 69.6 years). Peak oxygen uptake on a treadmill yielded estimated midlife CRF in 138 and late-life CRF in 73 participants. Results. Higher midlife CRF was associated with greater middle temporal gyrus, perirhinal cortex, and temporal and parietal white matter, but was not associated with atrophy progression. Slower atrophy in middle frontal and angular gyri was associated with higher late-life CRF, independent of CRF at baseline magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusions. Higher midlife CRF may play a role in preserving middle and medial temporal volumes in late adulthood. Slower atrophy in middle frontal and angular gyri may predict late-life CRF.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)124-130
Number of pages7
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume71
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2015

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular
  • Epidemiology
  • Neuroimaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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