Microscopic Polyangiitis

Sharon A. Chung, Philip Seo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In 1923, Friedrich Wohlwill described two patients with a " microscopic form of periarteritis nodosa," which was distinct from the classical form. This disease, now known as microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), is a primary systemic vasculitis characterized by inflammation of the small-caliber blood vessels and the presence of circulating antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. Typically, microscopic polyangiitis presents with glomerulonephritis and pulmonary capillaritis, although involvement of the skin, nerves, and gastrointestinal tract is not uncommon. Treatment of MPA generally requires use of a cytotoxic agent (such as cyclophosphamide) in addition to high-dose glucocorticoids. Recent research has focused on identifying alternate treatment strategies that minimize or eliminate exposure to cytotoxic agents. This article reviews the history, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and treatment of MPA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)545-558
Number of pages14
JournalRheumatic Disease Clinics of North America
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2010

Fingerprint

Microscopic Polyangiitis
Cytotoxins
Systemic Vasculitis
Polyarteritis Nodosa
Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies
Glomerulonephritis
Cyclophosphamide
Glucocorticoids
Blood Vessels
Gastrointestinal Tract
Therapeutics
History
Inflammation
Lung
Skin
Research

Keywords

  • Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies
  • Microscopic polyangiitis
  • Pulmonary-renal syndrome
  • Vasculitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Microscopic Polyangiitis. / Chung, Sharon A.; Seo, Philip.

In: Rheumatic Disease Clinics of North America, Vol. 36, No. 3, 08.2010, p. 545-558.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chung, Sharon A. ; Seo, Philip. / Microscopic Polyangiitis. In: Rheumatic Disease Clinics of North America. 2010 ; Vol. 36, No. 3. pp. 545-558.
@article{c0a733535e2c493cbea96db949f1d4b3,
title = "Microscopic Polyangiitis",
abstract = "In 1923, Friedrich Wohlwill described two patients with a {"} microscopic form of periarteritis nodosa,{"} which was distinct from the classical form. This disease, now known as microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), is a primary systemic vasculitis characterized by inflammation of the small-caliber blood vessels and the presence of circulating antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. Typically, microscopic polyangiitis presents with glomerulonephritis and pulmonary capillaritis, although involvement of the skin, nerves, and gastrointestinal tract is not uncommon. Treatment of MPA generally requires use of a cytotoxic agent (such as cyclophosphamide) in addition to high-dose glucocorticoids. Recent research has focused on identifying alternate treatment strategies that minimize or eliminate exposure to cytotoxic agents. This article reviews the history, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and treatment of MPA.",
keywords = "Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies, Microscopic polyangiitis, Pulmonary-renal syndrome, Vasculitis",
author = "Chung, {Sharon A.} and Philip Seo",
year = "2010",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1016/j.rdc.2010.04.003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "36",
pages = "545--558",
journal = "Rheumatic Disease Clinics of North America",
issn = "0889-857X",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Microscopic Polyangiitis

AU - Chung, Sharon A.

AU - Seo, Philip

PY - 2010/8

Y1 - 2010/8

N2 - In 1923, Friedrich Wohlwill described two patients with a " microscopic form of periarteritis nodosa," which was distinct from the classical form. This disease, now known as microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), is a primary systemic vasculitis characterized by inflammation of the small-caliber blood vessels and the presence of circulating antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. Typically, microscopic polyangiitis presents with glomerulonephritis and pulmonary capillaritis, although involvement of the skin, nerves, and gastrointestinal tract is not uncommon. Treatment of MPA generally requires use of a cytotoxic agent (such as cyclophosphamide) in addition to high-dose glucocorticoids. Recent research has focused on identifying alternate treatment strategies that minimize or eliminate exposure to cytotoxic agents. This article reviews the history, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and treatment of MPA.

AB - In 1923, Friedrich Wohlwill described two patients with a " microscopic form of periarteritis nodosa," which was distinct from the classical form. This disease, now known as microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), is a primary systemic vasculitis characterized by inflammation of the small-caliber blood vessels and the presence of circulating antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. Typically, microscopic polyangiitis presents with glomerulonephritis and pulmonary capillaritis, although involvement of the skin, nerves, and gastrointestinal tract is not uncommon. Treatment of MPA generally requires use of a cytotoxic agent (such as cyclophosphamide) in addition to high-dose glucocorticoids. Recent research has focused on identifying alternate treatment strategies that minimize or eliminate exposure to cytotoxic agents. This article reviews the history, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and treatment of MPA.

KW - Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies

KW - Microscopic polyangiitis

KW - Pulmonary-renal syndrome

KW - Vasculitis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77955249431&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77955249431&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.rdc.2010.04.003

DO - 10.1016/j.rdc.2010.04.003

M3 - Article

C2 - 20688249

AN - SCOPUS:77955249431

VL - 36

SP - 545

EP - 558

JO - Rheumatic Disease Clinics of North America

JF - Rheumatic Disease Clinics of North America

SN - 0889-857X

IS - 3

ER -