Micronutrients and the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus infection

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Micronutrient deficiencies may be common during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Insufficient dietary intake, malabsorption, diarrhoea, and impaired storage and altered metabolism of micronutrients can contribute to the development of micronutrient deficiencies. Low plasma or serum levels of vitamins A, E, B6, B12 and C, carotenoids, Se, and Zn are common in many HIV-infected populations. Micronutrient deficiencies may contribute to the pathogenesis of HIV infection through increased oxidative stress and compromised immunity. Low levels or intakes of micronutrients such as vitamins A, E, B6 and B12, Zn and Se have been associated with adverse clinical outcomes during HIV infection, and new studies are emerging which suggest that micronutrient supplementation may help reduce morbidity and mortality during HIV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-189
Number of pages9
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
Volume81
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Micronutrients
Virus Diseases
HIV
Vitamin A
Vitamin E
Carotenoids
Vitamin B 12
Diarrhea
Immunity
Oxidative Stress
Morbidity
Mortality
Serum
Population

Keywords

  • Human immunodeficiency virus
  • Malnutrition
  • Micronutrients

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Micronutrients and the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus infection. / Semba, Richard David; Tang, A. M.

In: British Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 81, No. 3, 1999, p. 181-189.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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