Micronutrient and inflammation status following one year of complementary food supplementation in 18-month-old rural bangladeshi children: A randomized controlled trial

Rebecca K. Campbell, Saijuddin Shaikh, Kerry Schulze, Margia Arguello, Hasmot Ali, Lee Wu, Keith P. West, Parul Christian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Four fortified complementary food supplements (CFSs) in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) were found to improve childhood linear growth in rural Bangladesh. We hypothesized children receiving these supplements would have improved micronutrient status. Methods: In the RCT, we assessed hemoglobin and serum ferritin, retinol, zinc, C-reactive protein (CRP), and α-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) at endline (18 mo) in a subsample of children (n = 752). The impact of supplementation on mean concentrations and the prevalence of nutrient deficiency and inflammation were evaluated using adjusted generalized estimating equation (GEE) linear and log-binomial regression models. Results: In the control arm at age 18 months, 13% of children were anemic (hemoglobin < 110 g/L), and 6% were iron (inflammation-adjusted ferritin < 12 µg/L), 8% vitamin A (inflammation-adjusted retinol < 0.70 µmol/L), and 5% zinc (zinc < 9.9 µmol/L) deficient. The prevalence of inflammation by CRP (>5 mg/L) and AGP (>1 g/L) was 23% and 66%, respectively, in the control group. AGP trended lower in CFS groups (p = 0.04), while CRP did not. Mean ferritin (p < 0.001) and retinol (p = 0.007) were higher in all supplemented groups relative to control, whereas hemoglobin improved with two of the four CFSs (p = 0.001), and zinc was equal or lower in supplemented groups relative to control (p = 0.017). Conclusions: CFSs improved iron status and vitamin A concentrations and lowered inflammation in a context of low underlying nutrient deficiency but high inflammation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1452
JournalNutrients
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2020

Keywords

  • Children
  • Complementary foods
  • Growth
  • Inflammation
  • Micronutrients
  • Supplementation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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