Microcontact printing

A versatile technique for the study of synaptogenic molecules

Toby Cornish, Darren W. Branch, Bruce C. Wheeler, James T. Campanelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

During synaptogenesis information exchanged locally between synaptic partners results in precise alignment of morphological and molecular specializations. For example, agrin derived from motoneurons induces localized postsynaptic differentiation at the neuromuscular synapse. Similar information molecules are thought to act at other synapses; however, techniques for directly evaluating synaptogenic activities of such molecules are lacking. Here we use agrin-induced differentiation as a model system to validate a novel approach for characterizing synaptogenic molecules. Proteins are patterned with micron scale resolution on glass coverslips by covalent microcontact printing and these substrates are used for cell culture. Postsynaptic molecules accumulate specifically at sites of contact between muscle cells and patterned agrin: a response which is quantifiable. Our results demonstrate that microcontact printing is applicable to the analysis of cellular response to locally immobilized information molecules.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)140-153
Number of pages14
JournalMolecular and Cellular Neuroscience
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Agrin
Printing
Synapses
Motor Neurons
Muscle Cells
Glass
Cell Culture Techniques
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Developmental Neuroscience

Cite this

Microcontact printing : A versatile technique for the study of synaptogenic molecules. / Cornish, Toby; Branch, Darren W.; Wheeler, Bruce C.; Campanelli, James T.

In: Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, Vol. 20, No. 1, 2002, p. 140-153.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cornish, Toby ; Branch, Darren W. ; Wheeler, Bruce C. ; Campanelli, James T. / Microcontact printing : A versatile technique for the study of synaptogenic molecules. In: Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience. 2002 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 140-153.
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