(Micro)biological, chemical and physical properties of soils subjected to conventional or no-till management: An assessment of their quality status

M. A. Aon, D. E. Sarena, J. L. Burgos, S. Cortassa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In order to evaluate the impact of no-tillage (NT) against conventional-tillage (CT), or the effect of different fertilizers and herbicides, soils recently incorporated to agriculture from the El Salado basin river (Buenos Aires, Argentina) under a corn (1996/1998)-pasture (1998-)rotation were monitored for several soil (micro)biological, physical and chemical properties during the second (1997) to fourth (1999) years from the beginning of the experiment (1996). The rates of exchange of O2 and CO2 expressed in terms of kg O2 or CO2-C per hectare per day, are denoted as qO2 and qCO2. They decreased at the end of the corn growth cycle (T2) along with an increase of the respiratory quotient (RQ = qCO2/qO2), when compared to the time of land preparation (T0), irrespective of the management system. Both, qO2 and qCO2, increased 8 months after the mixed-grass-legume pasture planting (T3) keeping similar RQs with values slightly higher for NT than CT. At T4 (after 20 months of pasture), a 22 and 21% decrease of organic carbon was registered for NT and CT, respectively, with respect to the beginning of the experiment. A 22% (not significative) and a significative 31% diminish of total nitrogen was observed in the NT and CT systems, respectively. The results obtained are discussed in terms of soil function and sustainability in both management systems tested.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages173-186
Number of pages14
JournalSoil and Tillage Research
Volume60
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

zero tillage
soil physical properties
conventional tillage
tillage
no-tillage
chemical property
physicochemical properties
physical property
pasture
management systems
soil
maize
pastures
respiratory quotient
corn
site preparation
forage legumes
herbicide
physical properties
Argentina

Keywords

  • Bacteria
  • Conventional or no-tillage
  • Corn and pasture yields
  • Fungi
  • Pore size distribution
  • Soil microbial respiration
  • Soil organic carbon
  • Soil quality
  • Sustainability
  • Water-filled pore space

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Soil Science

Cite this

(Micro)biological, chemical and physical properties of soils subjected to conventional or no-till management : An assessment of their quality status. / Aon, M. A.; Sarena, D. E.; Burgos, J. L.; Cortassa, S.

In: Soil and Tillage Research, Vol. 60, No. 3-4, 2001, p. 173-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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